Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 678 pages of information about Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1.
                    one verse.  ‘Amalgamation.’ 
  Mc.
    7 (.58 sec.) The verses are normal.
    5.3 Either first element of II. has its normal accent, or
                    it wavers to a secondary accent, and the verses
                    become one.
    5 (.416 sec.) First foot of II. has quite lost accent.  Amalgamation.
    3 (.25 sec.) ‘Last verse completely spoiled.’  Last verse
                            ’ ’ ’ ’
                    becomes —­ /- -, —­ — -, —­ — -, —­ —. 
                    Unsatisfactory.
    2 (.16 sec.) The II. has become mere ‘medley.’ 
  H.
    6 (.5 sec.) Normal.
    5 First element of II. attaches to I., and its accent is
                    lessened.
    3 (.25 sec.) First element of II. has lost its accent; the verses
                            ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
                    become —–­ —–­ —–­ — / — —–­ —–­ —–.  But one verse. 
                     Amalgamation. 
  J.
    5 (.42 sec.) Normal.
    4.6 First element of II. is losing accent.
    3 (.25 sec.) First two elements of II. ’tumble over each
                               ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
                     other.’ —–­ —–­ —–­ — / ——­ —–­ —–. 
                     Unsatisfactory.  Amalgamation. 
  L.
    5 (.42 sec.) Normal.
    4 Last element of I. losing accent.
    3.3 Last element of I. and first of II. have completely
                     lost accent.  Amalgamation. 
  G.
    7 (.58 sec.) Normal.
                   ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
    3 (.25 sec.) --- --- --- - / - ----- --- -.  Amalgamation.

Mi.
4.3(.35 sec.) Normal.
4 First two elements of II. equal in accent.
’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’
3 (.25 sec.) —–­ —–­ —–­ — / — —­ —–­ —–­ -.  Amalgamation.

As soon as the accents are within a certain distance they affect each other.  As a rule the first retains its original intensity and the second is weakened; rarely the first yields to the second.  The table shows that the distance at which this occurs is about .42 seconds.  Under many conditions it is quite possible for two accents to occur at that distance, e.g., in rapid rhythms, without any ‘fusing.’  The subject has a type of rhythm very definitely in mind and the only hypothesis which will explain the difficulty in observing the type, in spite of the slight change in time values, is that somehow the cyclic automatic movement has been affected and can no longer produce the normal, limiting sensation at the accent.  There is not time for the phase of relaxation before the next, objective, limiting sensation occurs.  We may figure the movement as follows: 

[Illustration:  FIG. 2.]

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Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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