Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 678 pages of information about Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1.

  (b) Above Combined in Series of Five.

Rate.      I        II      III       IV       V
60     0.976    1.097    1.129    1.119    1.117
90     1.018    1.009    1.044    1.059    1.054
120     1.003    0.993    1.010    1.042    1.001

In the following table (XV.) is presented the average proportional duration of the intervals separating the successive reactions of these subjects to the stimulations given by the alternate swing and return of the pendulum.

TABLE XV.

Subject.        Rate:  60.        Rate:  90.        Rate:  120. 
B.         0.744 :  1.000   0.870 :  1.000   0.773 :  1.000
J.         0.730 :  1.000   0.737 :  1.000   0.748 :  1.000
K.         0.696 :  1.000   0.728 :  1.000   0.737 :  1.000
N.         0.526 :  1.000   0.844 :  1.000   0.893 :  1.000

The corresponding intensive values, as measured by the excursion of the recording pen, are as follows: 

TABLE XVI.

Subject.        Rate:  60.        Rate:  90.        Rate:  120. 
B.        (1.066 :  1.000)  0.918 :  1.000  (1.010 :  1.000)
J.         0.938 :  1.000   0.943 :  1.000   0.946 :  1.000
K.         0.970 :  1.000   0.949 :  1.000  (1.034 :  1.000)
N.         0.883 :  1.000   0.900 :  1.000   0.950 :  1.000

These figures present a double process of rhythmic differentiation, intensively into stronger and weaker beats, and temporally into longer and shorter intervals.  The accentuation of alternate elements has an objective provocative in the qualitative unlikeness of the ticks given by the swing and return of the pendulum.  This phase is, however, neither so clearly marked nor so constant as the temporal grouping of the reactions.  In three cases the accent swings over to the shorter interval, which, according to the report of the subjects, formed the initial member of the group when such grouping came to subjective notice.  This latter tendency appears most pronounced at the fastest rate of reaction, and perhaps indicates a tendency at rapid tempos to prefer trochaic forms of rhythm.  In temporal grouping the cooerdination of results with the succession of rates presents an exception only in the case of one subject (XV.  B, Rate 120), and the various observers form a series in which the rhythmizing tendency becomes more and more pronounced.

Combining the reactions of the various subjects, the average for all shows an accentuation of the longer interval, as follows: 

TABLE XVII.

Rate.       Temp.  Diff.      Intens.  Diff.
60       0.674 :  1.000    0.714 :  1.000
90       0.795 :  1.000    0.927 :  1.000
120       0.788 :  1.000    0.985 :  1.000

The rhythmical differentiation of phases is greatest at the slowest tempo included in the series, namely, one beat per second, and it declines as the rate of

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook