Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 678 pages of information about Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1.
1           2           3           4           5          Indiv.  Aver.
1st   2d    1st   2d    1st   2d    1st   2d    1st   2d    1st   2d
I. 22.5  32.5  27    28    26.5  28    26.5  27.5  26    29    25.7  29.0
II.  4.5  43     9    29     3.5  38     0    43    17    44.5   6.8  39.5
III.  0    22     0    20.5   9.5  16.5   0    23.5   3.5   9.5   2.6  18.4
IV.  0    31     1    35.5   4.5  39    16.5  32.5  16    20.5   7.6  31.7
V. 24    52.5  41.5  40    12    53.5  22    55    22    50.5  24.3  50.3
VII.  1.5  52     0    48     0    54.5   0    50.5   0    46.5   0.3  50.3
VIII. 12    26    10    27.5  11.5  23.5  13.5  28.5  15.5  20    12.5  25.1
IX. 24    43.5  20    42    25    42.5  20.5  44.5  28    42.5  23.5  43.0
X.  9    45.5  19.5  30    11    33    12    38    14.5  30    13.2  35.3
XI. 12.5  35    23.5  29.5   1    49     2    44    10.5  52     9.9  41.9
11.00 38.30 15.15 33.00 10.45 37.75 11.30 38.70 15.30 34.50 12.64 36.45

    VI.—­Absent.

    From this point on the place of Miss H. (IV.) is taken by Mr.
    R. The members in each pair of objects in this group were not
    exposed simultaneously.

    1st:  refers to object first exposed.
    2d:  refers to object last exposed.

    General average:  1st, 12.64 sec.:  2d, 36.45 sec.

What is here called ideated movement—­by which is understood the idea of a change in spatial relations which accompanies a shifting of the attention or a change in the mental attitude, as distinguished from the sense of movements actually executed—­was recognized as such by one of the subjects, who says:  “When the two objects are before me I am conscious of what seem to be images of movement, or ideated movements, not actual movements.”  The same subject also finds the image of the object which had the longer exposure not only more vivid in the quality of the content, but more distinct in outline.

Series No.  IX.—­In this experiment the objects, which were of granite-gray cardboard, were exactly alike, but were exposed at different times and places.  After the first had been exposed five seconds alone, it was covered by means of a sliding screen, and the second was then exposed for the same length of time, the interval between the two exposures being also five seconds.  Two observations were made with each pair, the first exposure being in one case to the left and in the other case to the right.  The object here was, of course, to determine what, if any, advantage the more recent of the two locally different impressions would have in the course of ideation.  The table shows that the image of the object last seen had so far the advantage in the ideational rivalry that it remained in consciousness, on the average, almost three times as long as the other, the average being, for the first, 12.64 seconds; for the second, 36.45 seconds.  And both the individual averages and the averages for the several pairs show, without exception, the same general tendency.

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Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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