Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 678 pages of information about Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1.
they are on.”  “The larger is a little more distinct, as if it were nearer to me.”  “Large much more vivid than small.”  Such are the reports which run through the series.  And they point, undoubtedly, to a cumulative effect, corresponding to a well-known effect in sensation, in virtue of which greater extension may become the equivalent of greater intensity.  In other words, the larger image made the stronger impression.  Now in external perception the stronger impression tends to hold the attention more securely; that is, it is more effective in producing those adjustments of the sensory organs which perceptive attention implies.  So here what was noticed as the superior brightness and distinctness of the larger image may be supposed to imply some advantage in the latter in securing those adjustments of the mental attitude which were favorable to the apprehension of that image.  Advantage means here, again, in part at least, if the considerations we have urged are sound, inhibition of those motor processes which would tend to turn attention to a rival.  And here, again, the adjustment may reach no external organ.  An incipient innervation, which is all that we need assume as the condition of a change of mental attitude, would suffice to block, or at least to hamper, inconsistent innervations no more complete than itself.

[Illustration:  Fig. 4.]

TABLE IV.

1            2            3            4
G     W      G     W      G     W      G     W
I.   15.5  28.5   21.5  32.5   20    33     21    28.5
II.   39.5  23     22.5  22.5   19    20.5   35.5  17.5
III.   13.5  12.5   32     4.5    8.5  10     11.5  11.5
IV.   30    33.5   38    36.5   36    39.5   37.5  13.5
V.   33.5  32.5   34.5  32     33    35     45    36.5
VI.   15    22     21    21     18.5  22     12    22
VII.   53.5  50     43    46     54.5  55     56    56
VIII.   15.5  24.5   24    25     20    13     16.5  21
IX.   17.5  44      9.5  46     18.5  43.5   16    42
X.   25.5  19     29.5  19     21    20.5   23.5  18
XI.   35    42.5   13    29.5   18.5  46     16    38
294   332    288.5 314.5  267.5 338    290.5 304.5
5             6          7             8
G     W      G     W      G     W      G     W
I.   24    26.5   23.5  25     19.5  30.5   21    29
II.   21    29.5   20    18.5   29    16.5   28.5  14
III.   20.5   8.5   11    11.5   10    14     23    16.5
IV.   39.5  28.5   34.5  22.5   23    30.5   33.5  18
V.   45    53     48    51     45    29     32.5  34.5
VI.   21.5  28     18    32     20.5  19     21.5  18
VII.   54.5  56     54.5  54.5   45    46     49    49
VIII.   24    26.5   23.5  22.5   24    17.5   31    31.5
IX.   16    44     14    43.5    9    43.5   13    44.5
X.   24.5  18     24    21.5   25.5  24     22    22.5
XI.   20.5   8.5   15    36.5   33    23     34    29
311   327    286   339    283.5 293.5  309   306.5
9            10           11            12        Averages. 

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