Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 678 pages of information about Harvard Psychological Studies, Volume 1.

TABLE II.

1            2             3             4
S     C       S     C       S     C       S      C
I.  21.5  23.5    14.5  35      22.5  21.5    15     27
II.  35.5  21.5    32.5  48      32    33.5    32.5  21.5
III.  27.5  39      20.5  47.5    24.5  46.5     8    22.5
IV.  31.5  26.5    38    23.5    34.5  22      24    29.5
V.  48    50      48    39.5    41.5  51.5    51    47.5
VI.  11.5  35      26.5  28.5    21    33      29    17
VII.  29.5  35      47    47      10.5  52      29.5  33.5
VIII.  12.5  41      32    28.5    13    26.5    17    41.5
IX.  10.5  25.5    27.5  34.5    14.5  44      33    44.5
X.  24    25.5    20    23      16.5  28      23    21
XI.  46    46.5    31.5  53.5    18    53.5    27    50.5

        298 369 338 408.5 248.5 412 289 356

5              6             7               Averages. 
S     C       S     C       S      C              S      C
I.  20.5  21      14.5  27      7.5    37.5          16.57  27.50
II.  31.5  32      50    45.5    49.5   39.5          37.64  34.50
III.  19.5  32.5    13    31      29     18            20.28  33.85
IV.  40.5  46.5    27    30.5    26     32            31.64  30.07
V.  47.5  47.5    50.5  48.5    38     38            46.35  46.07
VI.  14.5  29      14    33      21     28.5          19.64  29.14
VII.  25.5  43      42.5  30      28     41.5          30.35  40.28
VIII.   8    34      24    27      33     14.5          19.92  30.42
IX.  41.5  27      29.5  27.5    29.5   28            26.57  33.00
X.  10.5  36.5    17    27      18     25            18.42  26.57
XI.  21.5  53.5    40.5  43.5    30     45            30.64  49.42

        281 402.5 322.5 370.5 309.5 347.5 27.10 34.62

    S: Outline simple.

    C: Outline complex.

In this and the following tables the numbers in the body of the columns represent, in each case, the combined result of two observations, in one of which the simpler figure was to the left, in the other the more complex.  The figures were transposed in order to eliminate any possible space error.

    General average:  S, 27.10 sec.; C, 34.62 sec.

Can anything be said, based on the reports, by way of explanation of the advantage which complexity gives?  In the first place, the attitude of the subject towards his image seems to have been much the same as his attitude towards an external object:  to his observation the image became, in fact, an object.  “When the image was gone,” says one, “my eyes seemed to be in search of something.”  And occasionally the one ideated object was felt to exert an influence over the other.  “The complex seemed to affect the form of the simpler figure.”  “It seemed that the complex actually had the effect of diminishing the size of the simpler figure.”  From time to time the images varied, too, in distinctness,

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