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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 301 pages of information about Alfred Russel Wallace.

C. DARWIN.

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LETTER IV

C. DARWIN TO A.R.  WALLACE

Down, Bromley, Kent.  April 6, 1859.

My dear Mr. Wallace,—­I this morning received your pleasant and friendly note of Nov. 30th.  The first part of my MS.[30] is in Murray’s hands, to see if he likes to publish it.  There is no Preface, but a short Introduction, which must be read by everyone who reads my book.  The second paragraph in the Introduction[31] I have had copied verbatim from my foul copy, and you will, I hope, think that I have fairly noticed your papers in the Linnean Transactions.[32] You must remember that I am now publishing only an Abstract, and I give no references.  I shall of course allude to your paper on Distribution;[33] and I have added that I know from correspondence that your explanation of your law is the same as that which I offer.  You are right, that I came to the conclusion that Selection was the principle of change from study of domesticated productions; and then reading Malthus I saw at once how to apply this principle.  Geographical distribution and geographical relations of extinct to recent inhabitants of South America first led me to the subject.  Especially the case of the Galapagos Islands.

I hope to go to press in early part of next month.  It will be a small volume of about 500 pages or so.  I will, of course, send you a copy.

I forget whether I told you that Hooker, who is our best British botanist, and perhaps the best in the world, is a full convert, and is now going immediately to publish his confession of faith; and I expect daily to see the proof-sheets.  Huxley is changed and believes in mutation of species:  whether a convert to us, I do not quite know.  We shall live to see all the younger men converts.  My neighbour and excellent naturalist, J. Lubbock, is an enthusiastic convert.  I see by Natural History notices that you are doing great work in the Archipelago; and most heartily do I sympathise with you.  For God’s sake take care of your health.  There have been few such noble labourers in the cause of natural science as you are.  Farewell, with every good wish.—­Yours sincerely,

C. DARWIN.

P.S.—­You cannot tell how I admire your spirit, in the manner in which you have taken all that was done about publishing our papers.  I had actually written a letter to you, stating that I would not publish anything before you had published.  I had not sent that letter to the post when I received one from Lyell and Hooker, urging me to send some MS. to them, and allow them to act as they thought fair and honourably to both of us.  I did so.

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LETTER V

C. DARWIN TO A.R.  WALLACE

Down, Bromley, Kent.  August 9, 1859.

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