Narrative of a Voyage to the Northwest Coast of America in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, and 1814 or the First American Settlement on the Pacific eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 192 pages of information about Narrative of a Voyage to the Northwest Coast of America in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, and 1814 or the First American Settlement on the Pacific.

Having related this trait of malice on the part of our captain, I shall be permitted to make some remarks on his character.  Jonathan Thorn was brought up in the naval service of his country, and had distinguished himself in a battle fought between the Americans and the Turks at Tripoli, some years before:  he held the rank of first lieutenant.  He was a strict disciplinarian, of a quick and passionate temper, accustomed to exact obedience, considering nothing but duty, and giving himself no trouble about the murmurs of his crew, taking counsel of nobody, and following Mr. Astor’s instructions to the letter.  Such was the man who had been selected to command our ship.  His haughty manners, his rough and overbearing disposition, had lost him the affection of most of the crew and of all the passengers:  he knew it, and in consequence sought every opportunity to mortify us.  It is true that the passengers had some reason to reproach themselves; they were not free from blame; but he had been the aggressor; and nothing could excuse the act of cruelty and barbarity of which he was guilty, in intending to leave us upon those barren rocks of the Falkland isles, where we must inevitably have perished.  This lot was reserved for us, but for the bold interference of Mr. B. Stuart, whose uncle was of our party, and who, seeing that the captain, far from waiting for us, coolly continued his course, threatened to blow his brains out unless he hove to and took us on board.

[Illustration:  VIEW OF THE FALKLAND ISLANDS Boat and five passengers pulling after Ship Tonquin.]

We pursued our course, bearing S.S.W., and on the 14th, in latitude 54 deg. 1’, longitude 64 deg. 18’, we found bottom at sixty-five fathoms, and saw a sail to the south.  On the 15th, in the morning, we discovered before us the high mountains of Terra del fuego, which we continued to see till evening:  the weather then thickened, and we lost sight of them.  We encountered a furious storm which drove us to the 56th degree and 18’ of latitude.  On the 18th, we were only fifteen leagues from Cape Horn.  A dead calm followed, but the current carried us within sight of the cape, five or six leagues distant.  This cape, which forms the southern extremity of the American continent, has always been an object of terror to the navigators who have to pass from one sea to the other; several of whom to avoid doubling it, have exposed themselves to the long and dangerous passage of the straits of Magellan, especially when about entering the Pacific ocean.  When we saw ourselves under the stupendous rocks of the cape, we felt no other desire but to get away from them as soon as possible, so little agreeable were those rocks to the view, even in the case of people who had been some months at sea!  And by the help of a land breeze we succeeded in gaining an offing.  While becalmed here, we measured the velocity of the current setting east, which we found to be about three miles an hour.

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Narrative of a Voyage to the Northwest Coast of America in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, and 1814 or the First American Settlement on the Pacific from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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