New National Fourth Reader eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 203 pages of information about New National Fourth Reader.

You may be sure that Shag was well taken care of after this incident.  Even after Halbert became a man Shag was his constant companion, and he lived to a good old age.

* * * * *

Language Lesson—­Let pupils add ship to each of the following words, and then give their meaning.

    friend hard relation partner fellow

Make out an analysis of the lesson, and use it in telling the story in your own words.

* * * * *

LESSON LII.

ebb’ing, flowing out; falling.

break’ers, waves breaking into foam against
     the shore_.

main, the great sea; the ocean.

reef, a row or chain of rocks.

dis mayed’, having lost courage.

strand, beach; shore.

treach’er ous, likely to do harm.

vic’tor, a successful warrior.

shroud’ing, covering over.

murk’y, gloomy; dark.

bea’con, a signal fire or light.

* * * * *

THE LIGHT-HOUSE.

  The tide comes up, and the tide goes down,
  Over the rocks, so rugged and brown,
  And the cruel sea, with a hungry roar,
  Dashes its breakers along the shore;
  But steady and clear, with a constant ray,
  The star of the light-house shines alway.

  The ships come sailing across the main,
  But the harbor mouth is hard to gain,
  For the treacherous reef lies close beside,
  And the rocks are bare at the ebbing tide,
  And the blinding fog comes down at night,
  Shrouding and hiding the harbor light.

  The sailors, sailing their ships along,
  Will tell you a tale of the light-house strong;
  How once, when the keeper was far away,
  A terrible storm swept down the bay,
  And two little children were left to keep
  Their awesome watch with the angry deep.

  The fair little sister wept, dismayed,
  But the brother said, “I am not afraid;
  There’s One who ruleth on sea and land,
  And holds the sea in His mighty hand;
  For mercy’s sake I will watch to-night,
  And feed, for the sailors, the beacon light.”

  So the sailors heard through the murky shroud
  The fog-bell sounding its warning loud! 
  While the children, up in the lonely tower,
  Tended the lamp in the midnight hour,
  And prayed for any whose souls might be
  In deadly peril by land or sea.

  Ghostly and dim, when the storm was o’er,
  The ships rode safely, far off the shore,
  And a boat shot out from the town that lay
  Dusk and purple, across the bay,
  She touched her keel to the light-house strand,
  And the eager keeper leaped to land.

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New National Fourth Reader from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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