New National Fourth Reader eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 203 pages of information about New National Fourth Reader.

“I was caught by the shoulder and hurled to the ground.  Growling terribly in my ear, the lion shook me as a dog does a rat.

“The shock produced a stupor, similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse after the first shake of a cat.

“The lion then leaped upon one of the natives who had tried to shoot at him, and then sprang at the neck of a second native who, armed with a spear, was rushing to the rescue.

[Illustration]

“The exertion was too much for the wounded beast, and so, with his claws bedded in the spearman’s shoulder, he rolled over and died.

“I had escaped, but with a shoulder so broken as to need an artificial joint, and with eleven teeth wounds in my arm.

“These wounds were less severe than they would have been, had not a heavy jacket which I had on, cleansed the teeth of the lion in their passage.  As it was, they were soon cured and gave me no trouble afterward.”

* * * * *

Directions for Reading.—­Read this lesson in a full and clear conversational tone of voice.

Those parts of the lesson to which we wish to call attention, should be read slowly.

Example.—­“The men edged in closer and closer, so that the lions might be completely surrounded.”

Should the slow and clear reading be kept up throughout pages 51 and 52, or should those pages be read more rapidly?[04]

* * * * *

Language Lesson.—­Syllabify, accent, and mark sounds of letters in the following words:  Livingstone, bullet, growling, jacket, offered, advice, severe.

Edged in closer and closer means went slowly nearer and nearer.

Let fly with both barrels means fired both barrels of his gun at the same time.

Still on its legs means not so badly wounded but that it was able to stand up.

Tell the story in your own words.

[04] See this lesson.

* * * * *

LESSON XI.

en riched’, made rich.

de tec’tion, being found out.

dis mount’ed, got down from.

sat’ is fied, supplied with all one wants.

sum’mit, top; highest point.

en trust’ed, gave the care of.

em ployed’, used; made use of.

im por’tant, worthy of attention.

ad dressed’, spoke to.

di’ a mond, a very valuable stone.

in clud’ ed, put in as a part.

* * * * *

THE NOBLEST DEED OF ALL.

A rich Persian, feeling himself growing old, and finding that the cares of business were too great for him, resolved, to divide his goods among his three sons, keeping a very small part to protect him from want in his old age.

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New National Fourth Reader from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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