Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“And so she is to come to us next Friday or Saturday, and the Campbells leave town in their way to Holyhead the Monday following—­ as you will find from Jane’s letter.  So sudden!—­You may guess, dear Miss Woodhouse, what a flurry it has thrown me in!  If it was not for the drawback of her illness—­but I am afraid we must expect to see her grown thin, and looking very poorly.  I must tell you what an unlucky thing happened to me, as to that.  I always make a point of reading Jane’s letters through to myself first, before I read them aloud to my mother, you know, for fear of there being any thing in them to distress her.  Jane desired me to do it, so I always do:  and so I began to-day with my usual caution; but no sooner did I come to the mention of her being unwell, than I burst out, quite frightened, with `Bless me! poor Jane is ill!’—­ which my mother, being on the watch, heard distinctly, and was sadly alarmed at.  However, when I read on, I found it was not near so bad as I had fancied at first; and I make so light of it now to her, that she does not think much about it.  But I cannot imagine how I could be so off my guard.  If Jane does not get well soon, we will call in Mr. Perry.  The expense shall not be thought of; and though he is so liberal, and so fond of Jane that I dare say he would not mean to charge any thing for attendance, we could not suffer it to be so, you know.  He has a wife and family to maintain, and is not to be giving away his time.  Well, now I have just given you a hint of what Jane writes about, we will turn to her letter, and I am sure she tells her own story a great deal better than I can tell it for her.”

“I am afraid we must be running away,” said Emma, glancing at Harriet, and beginning to rise—­“My father will be expecting us.  I had no intention, I thought I had no power of staying more than five minutes, when I first entered the house.  I merely called, because I would not pass the door without inquiring after Mrs. Bates; but I have been so pleasantly detained!  Now, however, we must wish you and Mrs. Bates good morning.”

And not all that could be urged to detain her succeeded.  She regained the street—­happy in this, that though much had been forced on her against her will, though she had in fact heard the whole substance of Jane Fairfax’s letter, she had been able to escape the letter itself.

CHAPTER II

Jane Fairfax was an orphan, the only child of Mrs. Bates’s youngest daughter.

The marriage of Lieut.  Fairfax of the _______ regiment of infantry,
and Miss Jane Bates, had had its day of fame and pleasure,
hope and interest; but nothing now remained of it, save the melancholy
remembrance of him dying in action abroad—­of his widow sinking
under consumption and grief soon afterwards—­and this girl.

By birth she belonged to Highbury:  and when at three years old, on losing her mother, she became the property, the charge, the consolation, the fondling of her grandmother and aunt, there had seemed every probability of her being permanently fixed there; of her being taught only what very limited means could command, and growing up with no advantages of connexion or improvement, to be engrafted on what nature had given her in a pleasing person, good understanding, and warm-hearted, well-meaning relations.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.