Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“You must feel it very fortunate that Miss Fairfax should be allowed to come to you at such a time.  Considering the very particular friendship between her and Mrs. Dixon, you could hardly have expected her to be excused from accompanying Colonel and Mrs. Campbell.”

“Very true, very true, indeed.  The very thing that we have always been rather afraid of; for we should not have liked to have her at such a distance from us, for months together—­not able to come if any thing was to happen.  But you see, every thing turns out for the best.  They want her (Mr. and Mrs. Dixon) excessively to come over with Colonel and Mrs. Campbell; quite depend upon it; nothing can be more kind or pressing than their joint invitation, Jane says, as you will hear presently; Mr. Dixon does not seem in the least backward in any attention.  He is a most charming young man.  Ever since the service he rendered Jane at Weymouth, when they were out in that party on the water, and she, by the sudden whirling round of something or other among the sails, would have been dashed into the sea at once, and actually was all but gone, if he had not, with the greatest presence of mind, caught hold of her habit—­ (I can never think of it without trembling!)—­But ever since we had the history of that day, I have been so fond of Mr. Dixon!”

“But, in spite of all her friends’ urgency, and her own wish of seeing Ireland, Miss Fairfax prefers devoting the time to you and Mrs. Bates?”

“Yes—­entirely her own doing, entirely her own choice; and Colonel and Mrs. Campbell think she does quite right, just what they should recommend; and indeed they particularly wish her to try her native air, as she has not been quite so well as usual lately.”

“I am concerned to hear of it.  I think they judge wisely.  But Mrs. Dixon must be very much disappointed.  Mrs. Dixon, I understand, has no remarkable degree of personal beauty; is not, by any means, to be compared with Miss Fairfax.”

“Oh! no.  You are very obliging to say such things—­but certainly not.  There is no comparison between them.  Miss Campbell always was absolutely plain—­but extremely elegant and amiable.”

“Yes, that of course.”

“Jane caught a bad cold, poor thing! so long ago as the 7th of November, (as I am going to read to you,) and has never been well since.  A long time, is not it, for a cold to hang upon her?  She never mentioned it before, because she would not alarm us.  Just like her! so considerate!—­But however, she is so far from well, that her kind friends the Campbells think she had better come home, and try an air that always agrees with her; and they have no doubt that three or four months at Highbury will entirely cure her—­ and it is certainly a great deal better that she should come here, than go to Ireland, if she is unwell.  Nobody could nurse her, as we should do.”

“It appears to me the most desirable arrangement in the world.”

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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