Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“I admired your resolution very much, sir,” said he, “in venturing out in such weather, for of course you saw there would be snow very soon.  Every body must have seen the snow coming on.  I admired your spirit; and I dare say we shall get home very well.  Another hour or two’s snow can hardly make the road impassable; and we are two carriages; if one is blown over in the bleak part of the common field there will be the other at hand.  I dare say we shall be all safe at Hartfield before midnight.”

Mr. Weston, with triumph of a different sort, was confessing that he had known it to be snowing some time, but had not said a word, lest it should make Mr. Woodhouse uncomfortable, and be an excuse for his hurrying away.  As to there being any quantity of snow fallen or likely to fall to impede their return, that was a mere joke; he was afraid they would find no difficulty.  He wished the road might be impassable, that he might be able to keep them all at Randalls; and with the utmost good-will was sure that accommodation might be found for every body, calling on his wife to agree with him, that with a little contrivance, every body might be lodged, which she hardly knew how to do, from the consciousness of there being but two spare rooms in the house.

“What is to be done, my dear Emma?—­what is to be done?” was Mr. Woodhouse’s first exclamation, and all that he could say for some time.  To her he looked for comfort; and her assurances of safety, her representation of the excellence of the horses, and of James, and of their having so many friends about them, revived him a little.

His eldest daughter’s alarm was equal to his own.  The horror of being blocked up at Randalls, while her children were at Hartfield, was full in her imagination; and fancying the road to be now just passable for adventurous people, but in a state that admitted no delay, she was eager to have it settled, that her father and Emma should remain at Randalls, while she and her husband set forward instantly through all the possible accumulations of drifted snow that might impede them.

“You had better order the carriage directly, my love,” said she; “I dare say we shall be able to get along, if we set off directly; and if we do come to any thing very bad, I can get out and walk.  I am not at all afraid.  I should not mind walking half the way.  I could change my shoes, you know, the moment I got home; and it is not the sort of thing that gives me cold.”

“Indeed!” replied he.  “Then, my dear Isabella, it is the most extraordinary sort of thing in the world, for in general every thing does give you cold.  Walk home!—­you are prettily shod for walking home, I dare say.  It will be bad enough for the horses.”

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.