Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

But at last there seemed a perverse turn; it seemed all at once as if he were more afraid of its being a bad sore throat on her account, than on Harriet’s—­more anxious that she should escape the infection, than that there should be no infection in the complaint.  He began with great earnestness to entreat her to refrain from visiting the sick-chamber again, for the present—­to entreat her to promise him not to venture into such hazard till he had seen Mr. Perry and learnt his opinion; and though she tried to laugh it off and bring the subject back into its proper course, there was no putting an end to his extreme solicitude about her.  She was vexed.  It did appear—­there was no concealing it—­exactly like the pretence of being in love with her, instead of Harriet; an inconstancy, if real, the most contemptible and abominable! and she had difficulty in behaving with temper.  He turned to Mrs. Weston to implore her assistance, “Would not she give him her support?—­would not she add her persuasions to his, to induce Miss Woodhouse not to go to Mrs. Goddard’s till it were certain that Miss Smith’s disorder had no infection?  He could not be satisfied without a promise—­ would not she give him her influence in procuring it?”

“So scrupulous for others,” he continued, “and yet so careless for herself!  She wanted me to nurse my cold by staying at home to-day, and yet will not promise to avoid the danger of catching an ulcerated sore throat herself.  Is this fair, Mrs. Weston?—­Judge between us.  Have not I some right to complain?  I am sure of your kind support and aid.”

Emma saw Mrs. Weston’s surprize, and felt that it must be great, at an address which, in words and manner, was assuming to himself the right of first interest in her; and as for herself, she was too much provoked and offended to have the power of directly saying any thing to the purpose.  She could only give him a look; but it was such a look as she thought must restore him to his senses, and then left the sofa, removing to a seat by her sister, and giving her all her attention.

She had not time to know how Mr. Elton took the reproof, so rapidly did another subject succeed; for Mr. John Knightley now came into the room from examining the weather, and opened on them all with the information of the ground being covered with snow, and of its still snowing fast, with a strong drifting wind; concluding with these words to Mr. Woodhouse: 

“This will prove a spirited beginning of your winter engagements, sir.  Something new for your coachman and horses to be making their way through a storm of snow.”

Poor Mr. Woodhouse was silent from consternation; but every body else had something to say; every body was either surprized or not surprized, and had some question to ask, or some comfort to offer.  Mrs. Weston and Emma tried earnestly to cheer him and turn his attention from his son-in-law, who was pursuing his triumph rather unfeelingly.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.