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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“Well, I believe, if you will excuse me, Mr. Knightley, if you will not consider me as doing a very rude thing, I shall take Emma’s advice and go out for a quarter of an hour.  As the sun is out, I believe I had better take my three turns while I can.  I treat you without ceremony, Mr. Knightley.  We invalids think we are privileged people.”

“My dear sir, do not make a stranger of me.”

“I leave an excellent substitute in my daughter.  Emma will be happy to entertain you.  And therefore I think I will beg your excuse and take my three turns—­my winter walk.”

“You cannot do better, sir.”

“I would ask for the pleasure of your company, Mr. Knightley, but I am a very slow walker, and my pace would be tedious to you; and, besides, you have another long walk before you, to Donwell Abbey.”

“Thank you, sir, thank you; I am going this moment myself; and I think the sooner you go the better.  I will fetch your greatcoat and open the garden door for you.”

Mr. Woodhouse at last was off; but Mr. Knightley, instead of being immediately off likewise, sat down again, seemingly inclined for more chat.  He began speaking of Harriet, and speaking of her with more voluntary praise than Emma had ever heard before.

“I cannot rate her beauty as you do,” said he; “but she is a pretty little creature, and I am inclined to think very well of her disposition.  Her character depends upon those she is with; but in good hands she will turn out a valuable woman.”

“I am glad you think so; and the good hands, I hope, may not be wanting.”

“Come,” said he, “you are anxious for a compliment, so I will tell you that you have improved her.  You have cured her of her school-girl’s giggle; she really does you credit.”

“Thank you.  I should be mortified indeed if I did not believe I had been of some use; but it is not every body who will bestow praise where they may. You do not often overpower me with it.”

“You are expecting her again, you say, this morning?”

“Almost every moment.  She has been gone longer already than she intended.”

“Something has happened to delay her; some visitors perhaps.”

“Highbury gossips!—­Tiresome wretches!”

“Harriet may not consider every body tiresome that you would.”

Emma knew this was too true for contradiction, and therefore said nothing.  He presently added, with a smile,

“I do not pretend to fix on times or places, but I must tell you that I have good reason to believe your little friend will soon hear of something to her advantage.”

“Indeed! how so? of what sort?”

“A very serious sort, I assure you;” still smiling.

“Very serious!  I can think of but one thing—­Who is in love with her?  Who makes you their confidant?”

Emma was more than half in hopes of Mr. Elton’s having dropt a hint.  Mr. Knightley was a sort of general friend and adviser, and she knew Mr. Elton looked up to him.

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