Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

She had soon fixed on the size and sort of portrait.  It was to be a whole-length in water-colours, like Mr. John Knightley’s, and was destined, if she could please herself, to hold a very honourable station over the mantelpiece.

The sitting began; and Harriet, smiling and blushing, and afraid of not keeping her attitude and countenance, presented a very sweet mixture of youthful expression to the steady eyes of the artist.  But there was no doing any thing, with Mr. Elton fidgeting behind her and watching every touch.  She gave him credit for stationing himself where he might gaze and gaze again without offence; but was really obliged to put an end to it, and request him to place himself elsewhere.  It then occurred to her to employ him in reading.

“If he would be so good as to read to them, it would be a kindness indeed!  It would amuse away the difficulties of her part, and lessen the irksomeness of Miss Smith’s.”

Mr. Elton was only too happy.  Harriet listened, and Emma drew in peace.  She must allow him to be still frequently coming to look; any thing less would certainly have been too little in a lover; and he was ready at the smallest intermission of the pencil, to jump up and see the progress, and be charmed.—­There was no being displeased with such an encourager, for his admiration made him discern a likeness almost before it was possible.  She could not respect his eye, but his love and his complaisance were unexceptionable.

The sitting was altogether very satisfactory; she was quite enough pleased with the first day’s sketch to wish to go on.  There was no want of likeness, she had been fortunate in the attitude, and as she meant to throw in a little improvement to the figure, to give a little more height, and considerably more elegance, she had great confidence of its being in every way a pretty drawing at last, and of its filling its destined place with credit to them both—­a standing memorial of the beauty of one, the skill of the other, and the friendship of both; with as many other agreeable associations as Mr. Elton’s very promising attachment was likely to add.

Harriet was to sit again the next day; and Mr. Elton, just as he ought, entreated for the permission of attending and reading to them again.

“By all means.  We shall be most happy to consider you as one of the party.”

The same civilities and courtesies, the same success and satisfaction, took place on the morrow, and accompanied the whole progress of the picture, which was rapid and happy.  Every body who saw it was pleased, but Mr. Elton was in continual raptures, and defended it through every criticism.

“Miss Woodhouse has given her friend the only beauty she wanted,”—­observed Mrs. Weston to him—­not in the least suspecting that she was addressing a lover.—­“The expression of the eye is most correct, but Miss Smith has not those eyebrows and eyelashes.  It is the fault of her face that she has them not.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.