Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“Poor girl!” said Emma again.  “She loves him then excessively, I suppose.  It must have been from attachment only, that she could be led to form the engagement.  Her affection must have overpowered her judgment.”

“Yes, I have no doubt of her being extremely attached to him.”

“I am afraid,” returned Emma, sighing, “that I must often have contributed to make her unhappy.”

“On your side, my love, it was very innocently done.  But she probably had something of that in her thoughts, when alluding to the misunderstandings which he had given us hints of before.  One natural consequence of the evil she had involved herself in,” she said, “was that of making her unreasonable.  The consciousness of having done amiss, had exposed her to a thousand inquietudes, and made her captious and irritable to a degree that must have been—­ that had been—­hard for him to bear. `I did not make the allowances,’ said she, `which I ought to have done, for his temper and spirits—­ his delightful spirits, and that gaiety, that playfulness of disposition, which, under any other circumstances, would, I am sure, have been as constantly bewitching to me, as they were at first.’  She then began to speak of you, and of the great kindness you had shewn her during her illness; and with a blush which shewed me how it was all connected, desired me, whenever I had an opportunity, to thank you—­I could not thank you too much—­for every wish and every endeavour to do her good.  She was sensible that you had never received any proper acknowledgment from herself.”

“If I did not know her to be happy now,” said Emma, seriously, “which, in spite of every little drawback from her scrupulous conscience, she must be, I could not bear these thanks;—­for, oh!  Mrs. Weston, if there were an account drawn up of the evil and the good I have done Miss Fairfax!—­Well (checking herself, and trying to be more lively), this is all to be forgotten.  You are very kind to bring me these interesting particulars.  They shew her to the greatest advantage.  I am sure she is very good—­ I hope she will be very happy.  It is fit that the fortune should be on his side, for I think the merit will be all on hers.”

Such a conclusion could not pass unanswered by Mrs. Weston.  She thought well of Frank in almost every respect; and, what was more, she loved him very much, and her defence was, therefore, earnest.  She talked with a great deal of reason, and at least equal affection—­ but she had too much to urge for Emma’s attention; it was soon gone to Brunswick Square or to Donwell; she forgot to attempt to listen; and when Mrs. Weston ended with, “We have not yet had the letter we are so anxious for, you know, but I hope it will soon come,” she was obliged to pause before she answered, and at last obliged to answer at random, before she could at all recollect what letter it was which they were so anxious for.

“Are you well, my Emma?” was Mrs. Weston’s parting question.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook