Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

This was so very well understood between them, that Emma could not but feel some surprise, and a little displeasure, on hearing from Mr. Weston that he had been proposing to Mrs. Elton, as her brother and sister had failed her, that the two parties should unite, and go together; and that as Mrs. Elton had very readily acceded to it, so it was to be, if she had no objection.  Now, as her objection was nothing but her very great dislike of Mrs. Elton, of which Mr. Weston must already be perfectly aware, it was not worth bringing forward again:—­it could not be done without a reproof to him, which would be giving pain to his wife; and she found herself therefore obliged to consent to an arrangement which she would have done a great deal to avoid; an arrangement which would probably expose her even to the degradation of being said to be of Mrs. Elton’s party!  Every feeling was offended; and the forbearance of her outward submission left a heavy arrear due of secret severity in her reflections on the unmanageable goodwill of Mr. Weston’s temper.

“I am glad you approve of what I have done,” said he very comfortably.  “But I thought you would.  Such schemes as these are nothing without numbers.  One cannot have too large a party.  A large party secures its own amusement.  And she is a good-natured woman after all.  One could not leave her out.”

Emma denied none of it aloud, and agreed to none of it in private.

It was now the middle of June, and the weather fine; and Mrs. Elton was growing impatient to name the day, and settle with Mr. Weston as to pigeon-pies and cold lamb, when a lame carriage-horse threw every thing into sad uncertainty.  It might be weeks, it might be only a few days, before the horse were useable; but no preparations could be ventured on, and it was all melancholy stagnation.  Mrs. Elton’s resources were inadequate to such an attack.

“Is not this most vexations, Knightley?” she cried.—­“And such weather for exploring!—­These delays and disappointments are quite odious.  What are we to do?—­The year will wear away at this rate, and nothing done.  Before this time last year I assure you we had had a delightful exploring party from Maple Grove to Kings Weston.”

“You had better explore to Donwell,” replied Mr. Knightley.  “That may be done without horses.  Come, and eat my strawberries.  They are ripening fast.”

If Mr. Knightley did not begin seriously, he was obliged to proceed so, for his proposal was caught at with delight; and the “Oh!  I should like it of all things,” was not plainer in words than manner.  Donwell was famous for its strawberry-beds, which seemed a plea for the invitation:  but no plea was necessary; cabbage-beds would have been enough to tempt the lady, who only wanted to be going somewhere.  She promised him again and again to come—­much oftener than he doubted—­and was extremely gratified by such a proof of intimacy, such a distinguishing compliment as she chose to consider it.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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