Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

Such an adventure as this,—­a fine young man and a lovely young woman thrown together in such a way, could hardly fail of suggesting certain ideas to the coldest heart and the steadiest brain.  So Emma thought, at least.  Could a linguist, could a grammarian, could even a mathematician have seen what she did, have witnessed their appearance together, and heard their history of it, without feeling that circumstances had been at work to make them peculiarly interesting to each other?—­How much more must an imaginist, like herself, be on fire with speculation and foresight!—­especially with such a groundwork of anticipation as her mind had already made.

It was a very extraordinary thing!  Nothing of the sort had ever occurred before to any young ladies in the place, within her memory; no rencontre, no alarm of the kind;—­and now it had happened to the very person, and at the very hour, when the other very person was chancing to pass by to rescue her!—­It certainly was very extraordinary!—­And knowing, as she did, the favourable state of mind of each at this period, it struck her the more.  He was wishing to get the better of his attachment to herself, she just recovering from her mania for Mr. Elton.  It seemed as if every thing united to promise the most interesting consequences.  It was not possible that the occurrence should not be strongly recommending each to the other.

In the few minutes’ conversation which she had yet had with him, while Harriet had been partially insensible, he had spoken of her terror, her naivete, her fervour as she seized and clung to his arm, with a sensibility amused and delighted; and just at last, after Harriet’s own account had been given, he had expressed his indignation at the abominable folly of Miss Bickerton in the warmest terms.  Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted.  She would not stir a step, nor drop a hint.  No, she had had enough of interference.  There could be no harm in a scheme, a mere passive scheme.  It was no more than a wish.  Beyond it she would on no account proceed.

Emma’s first resolution was to keep her father from the knowledge of what had passed,—­aware of the anxiety and alarm it would occasion:  but she soon felt that concealment must be impossible.  Within half an hour it was known all over Highbury.  It was the very event to engage those who talk most, the young and the low; and all the youth and servants in the place were soon in the happiness of frightful news.  The last night’s ball seemed lost in the gipsies.  Poor Mr. Woodhouse trembled as he sat, and, as Emma had foreseen, would scarcely be satisfied without their promising never to go beyond the shrubbery again.  It was some comfort to him that many inquiries after himself and Miss Woodhouse (for his neighbours knew that he loved to be inquired after), as well as Miss Smith, were coming in during the rest of the day; and he had the pleasure of returning for answer, that they were all very indifferent—­ which, though not exactly true, for she was perfectly well, and Harriet not much otherwise, Emma would not interfere with.  She had an unhappy state of health in general for the child of such a man, for she hardly knew what indisposition was; and if he did not invent illnesses for her, she could make no figure in a message.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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