Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

Frank Churchill seemed to have been on the watch; and though he did not say much, his eyes declared that he meant to have a delightful evening.  They all walked about together, to see that every thing was as it should be; and within a few minutes were joined by the contents of another carriage, which Emma could not hear the sound of at first, without great surprize.  “So unreasonably early!” she was going to exclaim; but she presently found that it was a family of old friends, who were coming, like herself, by particular desire, to help Mr. Weston’s judgment; and they were so very closely followed by another carriage of cousins, who had been entreated to come early with the same distinguishing earnestness, on the same errand, that it seemed as if half the company might soon be collected together for the purpose of preparatory inspection.

Emma perceived that her taste was not the only taste on which Mr. Weston depended, and felt, that to be the favourite and intimate of a man who had so many intimates and confidantes, was not the very first distinction in the scale of vanity.  She liked his open manners, but a little less of open-heartedness would have made him a higher character.—­General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be.—­ She could fancy such a man.  The whole party walked about, and looked, and praised again; and then, having nothing else to do, formed a sort of half-circle round the fire, to observe in their various modes, till other subjects were started, that, though May, a fire in the evening was still very pleasant.

Emma found that it was not Mr. Weston’s fault that the number of privy councillors was not yet larger.  They had stopped at Mrs. Bates’s door to offer the use of their carriage, but the aunt and niece were to be brought by the Eltons.

Frank was standing by her, but not steadily; there was a restlessness, which shewed a mind not at ease.  He was looking about, he was going to the door, he was watching for the sound of other carriages,—­ impatient to begin, or afraid of being always near her.

Mrs. Elton was spoken of.  “I think she must be here soon,” said he.  “I have a great curiosity to see Mrs. Elton, I have heard so much of her.  It cannot be long, I think, before she comes.”

A carriage was heard.  He was on the move immediately; but coming back, said,

“I am forgetting that I am not acquainted with her.  I have never seen either Mr. or Mrs. Elton.  I have no business to put myself forward.”

Mr. and Mrs. Elton appeared; and all the smiles and the proprieties passed.

“But Miss Bates and Miss Fairfax!” said Mr. Weston, looking about.  “We thought you were to bring them.”

The mistake had been slight.  The carriage was sent for them now.  Emma longed to know what Frank’s first opinion of Mrs. Elton might be; how he was affected by the studied elegance of her dress, and her smiles of graciousness.  He was immediately qualifying himself to form an opinion, by giving her very proper attention, after the introduction had passed.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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