Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“Upon my word,” exclaimed Emma, “you amuse me!  I should like to know how many of all my numerous engagements take place without your being of the party; and why I am to be supposed in danger of wanting leisure to attend to the little boys.  These amazing engagements of mine—­ what have they been?  Dining once with the Coles—­and having a ball talked of, which never took place.  I can understand you—­(nodding at Mr. John Knightley)—­your good fortune in meeting with so many of your friends at once here, delights you too much to pass unnoticed.  But you, (turning to Mr. Knightley,) who know how very, very seldom I am ever two hours from Hartfield, why you should foresee such a series of dissipation for me, I cannot imagine.  And as to my dear little boys, I must say, that if Aunt Emma has not time for them, I do not think they would fare much better with Uncle Knightley, who is absent from home about five hours where she is absent one—­ and who, when he is at home, is either reading to himself or settling his accounts.”

Mr. Knightley seemed to be trying not to smile; and succeeded without difficulty, upon Mrs. Elton’s beginning to talk to him.

VOLUME III

CHAPTER I

A very little quiet reflection was enough to satisfy Emma as to the nature of her agitation on hearing this news of Frank Churchill.  She was soon convinced that it was not for herself she was feeling at all apprehensive or embarrassed; it was for him.  Her own attachment had really subsided into a mere nothing; it was not worth thinking of;—­ but if he, who had undoubtedly been always so much the most in love of the two, were to be returning with the same warmth of sentiment which he had taken away, it would be very distressing.  If a separation of two months should not have cooled him, there were dangers and evils before her:—­caution for him and for herself would be necessary.  She did not mean to have her own affections entangled again, and it would be incumbent on her to avoid any encouragement of his.

She wished she might be able to keep him from an absolute declaration.  That would be so very painful a conclusion of their present acquaintance! and yet, she could not help rather anticipating something decisive.  She felt as if the spring would not pass without bringing a crisis, an event, a something to alter her present composed and tranquil state.

It was not very long, though rather longer than Mr. Weston had foreseen, before she had the power of forming some opinion of Frank Churchill’s feelings.  The Enscombe family were not in town quite so soon as had been imagined, but he was at Highbury very soon afterwards.  He rode down for a couple of hours; he could not yet do more; but as he came from Randalls immediately to Hartfield, she could then exercise all her quick observation, and speedily determine how he was influenced, and how she must act. 

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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