Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

As for Mr. Elton, his manners did not appear—­but no, she would not permit a hasty or a witty word from herself about his manners.  It was an awkward ceremony at any time to be receiving wedding visits, and a man had need be all grace to acquit himself well through it.  The woman was better off; she might have the assistance of fine clothes, and the privilege of bashfulness, but the man had only his own good sense to depend on; and when she considered how peculiarly unlucky poor Mr. Elton was in being in the same room at once with the woman he had just married, the woman he had wanted to marry, and the woman whom he had been expected to marry, she must allow him to have the right to look as little wise, and to be as much affectedly, and as little really easy as could be.

“Well, Miss Woodhouse,” said Harriet, when they had quitted the house, and after waiting in vain for her friend to begin; “Well, Miss Woodhouse, (with a gentle sigh,) what do you think of her?—­ Is not she very charming?”

There was a little hesitation in Emma’s answer.

“Oh! yes—­very—­a very pleasing young woman.”

“I think her beautiful, quite beautiful.”

“Very nicely dressed, indeed; a remarkably elegant gown.”

“I am not at all surprized that he should have fallen in love.”

“Oh! no—­there is nothing to surprize one at all.—­A pretty fortune; and she came in his way.”

“I dare say,” returned Harriet, sighing again, “I dare say she was very much attached to him.”

“Perhaps she might; but it is not every man’s fate to marry the woman who loves him best.  Miss Hawkins perhaps wanted a home, and thought this the best offer she was likely to have.”

“Yes,” said Harriet earnestly, “and well she might, nobody could ever have a better.  Well, I wish them happy with all my heart.  And now, Miss Woodhouse, I do not think I shall mind seeing them again.  He is just as superior as ever;—­but being married, you know, it is quite a different thing.  No, indeed, Miss Woodhouse, you need not be afraid; I can sit and admire him now without any great misery.  To know that he has not thrown himself away, is such a comfort!—­ She does seem a charming young woman, just what he deserves.  Happy creature!  He called her `Augusta.’  How delightful!”

When the visit was returned, Emma made up her mind.  She could then see more and judge better.  From Harriet’s happening not to be at Hartfield, and her father’s being present to engage Mr. Elton, she had a quarter of an hour of the lady’s conversation to herself, and could composedly attend to her; and the quarter of an hour quite convinced her that Mrs. Elton was a vain woman, extremely well satisfied with herself, and thinking much of her own importance; that she meant to shine and be very superior, but with manners which had been formed in a bad school, pert and familiar; that all her notions were drawn from one set of people, and one style of living; that if not foolish she was ignorant, and that her society would certainly do Mr. Elton no good.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.