Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

It was well to have a comfort in store on Harriet’s behalf, though it might be wise to let the fancy touch it seldom; for evil in that quarter was at hand.  As Frank Churchill’s arrival had succeeded Mr. Elton’s engagement in the conversation of Highbury, as the latest interest had entirely borne down the first, so now upon Frank Churchill’s disappearance, Mr. Elton’s concerns were assuming the most irresistible form.—­His wedding-day was named.  He would soon be among them again; Mr. Elton and his bride.  There was hardly time to talk over the first letter from Enscombe before “Mr. Elton and his bride” was in every body’s mouth, and Frank Churchill was forgotten.  Emma grew sick at the sound.  She had had three weeks of happy exemption from Mr. Elton; and Harriet’s mind, she had been willing to hope, had been lately gaining strength.  With Mr. Weston’s ball in view at least, there had been a great deal of insensibility to other things; but it was now too evident that she had not attained such a state of composure as could stand against the actual approach—­new carriage, bell-ringing, and all.

Poor Harriet was in a flutter of spirits which required all the reasonings and soothings and attentions of every kind that Emma could give.  Emma felt that she could not do too much for her, that Harriet had a right to all her ingenuity and all her patience; but it was heavy work to be for ever convincing without producing any effect, for ever agreed to, without being able to make their opinions the same.  Harriet listened submissively, and said “it was very true—­ it was just as Miss Woodhouse described—­it was not worth while to think about them—­and she would not think about them any longer” but no change of subject could avail, and the next half-hour saw her as anxious and restless about the Eltons as before.  At last Emma attacked her on another ground.

“Your allowing yourself to be so occupied and so unhappy about Mr. Elton’s marrying, Harriet, is the strongest reproach you can make me.  You could not give me a greater reproof for the mistake I fell into.  It was all my doing, I know.  I have not forgotten it, I assure you.—­Deceived myself, I did very miserably deceive you—­ and it will be a painful reflection to me for ever.  Do not imagine me in danger of forgetting it.”

Harriet felt this too much to utter more than a few words of eager exclamation.  Emma continued,

“I have not said, exert yourself Harriet for my sake; think less, talk less of Mr. Elton for my sake; because for your own sake rather, I would wish it to be done, for the sake of what is more important than my comfort, a habit of self-command in you, a consideration of what is your duty, an attention to propriety, an endeavour to avoid the suspicions of others, to save your health and credit, and restore your tranquillity.  These are the motives which I have been pressing on you.  They are very important—­and sorry I am that you cannot feel them sufficiently to act upon them.  My being saved from pain is a very secondary consideration.  I want you to save yourself from greater pain.  Perhaps I may sometimes have felt that Harriet would not forget what was due—­or rather what would be kind by me.”

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.