Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“And here is Mrs. Weston and Mr. Frank Churchill too!—­Quite delightful; so many friends!”

“No, not now, I thank you.  I could not stay two minutes. 
I must get on to Kingston as fast as I can.”

“Oh! do come in.  They will be so very happy to see you.”

“No, no; your room is full enough.  I will call another day, and hear the pianoforte.”

“Well, I am so sorry!—­Oh!  Mr. Knightley, what a delightful party last night; how extremely pleasant.—­Did you ever see such dancing?—­ Was not it delightful?—­Miss Woodhouse and Mr. Frank Churchill; I never saw any thing equal to it.”

“Oh! very delightful indeed; I can say nothing less, for I suppose Miss Woodhouse and Mr. Frank Churchill are hearing every thing that passes.  And (raising his voice still more) I do not see why Miss Fairfax should not be mentioned too.  I think Miss Fairfax dances very well; and Mrs. Weston is the very best country-dance player, without exception, in England.  Now, if your friends have any gratitude, they will say something pretty loud about you and me in return; but I cannot stay to hear it.”

“Oh!  Mr. Knightley, one moment more; something of consequence—­ so shocked!—­Jane and I are both so shocked about the apples!”

“What is the matter now?”

“To think of your sending us all your store apples.  You said you had a great many, and now you have not one left.  We really are so shocked!  Mrs. Hodges may well be angry.  William Larkins mentioned it here.  You should not have done it, indeed you should not.  Ah! he is off.  He never can bear to be thanked.  But I thought he would have staid now, and it would have been a pity not to have mentioned. . . .  Well, (returning to the room,) I have not been able to succeed.  Mr. Knightley cannot stop.  He is going to Kingston.  He asked me if he could do any thing. . . .”

“Yes,” said Jane, “we heard his kind offers, we heard every thing.”

“Oh! yes, my dear, I dare say you might, because you know, the door was open, and the window was open, and Mr. Knightley spoke loud.  You must have heard every thing to be sure. `Can I do any thing for you at Kingston?’ said he; so I just mentioned. . . .  Oh!  Miss Woodhouse, must you be going?—­You seem but just come—­so very obliging of you.”

Emma found it really time to be at home; the visit had already lasted long; and on examining watches, so much of the morning was perceived to be gone, that Mrs. Weston and her companion taking leave also, could allow themselves only to walk with the two young ladies to Hartfield gates, before they set off for Randalls.

CHAPTER XI

It may be possible to do without dancing entirely.  Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively, without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind;—­but when a beginning is made—­ when the felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt—­it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.

Follow Us on Facebook