Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.
never was such a keeping apple anywhere as one of his trees—­I believe there is two of them.  My mother says the orchard was always famous in her younger days.  But I was really quite shocked the other day—­ for Mr. Knightley called one morning, and Jane was eating these apples, and we talked about them and said how much she enjoyed them, and he asked whether we were not got to the end of our stock. `I am sure you must be,’ said he, `and I will send you another supply; for I have a great many more than I can ever use.  William Larkins let me keep a larger quantity than usual this year.  I will send you some more, before they get good for nothing.’  So I begged he would not—­for really as to ours being gone, I could not absolutely say that we had a great many left—­it was but half a dozen indeed; but they should be all kept for Jane; and I could not at all bear that he should be sending us more, so liberal as he had been already; and Jane said the same.  And when he was gone, she almost quarrelled with me—­No, I should not say quarrelled, for we never had a quarrel in our lives; but she was quite distressed that I had owned the apples were so nearly gone; she wished I had made him believe we had a great many left.  Oh, said I, my dear, I did say as much as I could.  However, the very same evening William Larkins came over with a large basket of apples, the same sort of apples, a bushel at least, and I was very much obliged, and went down and spoke to William Larkins and said every thing, as you may suppose.  William Larkins is such an old acquaintance!  I am always glad to see him.  But, however, I found afterwards from Patty, that William said it was all the apples of that sort his master had; he had brought them all—­and now his master had not one left to bake or boil.  William did not seem to mind it himself, he was so pleased to think his master had sold so many; for William, you know, thinks more of his master’s profit than any thing; but Mrs. Hodges, he said, was quite displeased at their being all sent away.  She could not bear that her master should not be able to have another apple-tart this spring.  He told Patty this, but bid her not mind it, and be sure not to say any thing to us about it, for Mrs. Hodges would be cross sometimes, and as long as so many sacks were sold, it did not signify who ate the remainder.  And so Patty told me, and I was excessively shocked indeed!  I would not have Mr. Knightley know any thing about it for the world!  He would be so very. . . .  I wanted to keep it from Jane’s knowledge; but, unluckily, I had mentioned it before I was aware.”

Miss Bates had just done as Patty opened the door; and her visitors walked upstairs without having any regular narration to attend to, pursued only by the sounds of her desultory good-will.

“Pray take care, Mrs. Weston, there is a step at the turning.  Pray take care, Miss Woodhouse, ours is rather a dark staircase—­ rather darker and narrower than one could wish.  Miss Smith, pray take care.  Miss Woodhouse, I am quite concerned, I am sure you hit your foot.  Miss Smith, the step at the turning.”

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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