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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“Ah! but Jane Fairfax has them both, Harriet.”

“Are you sure?  I saw she had execution, but I did not know she had any taste.  Nobody talked about it.  And I hate Italian singing.—­ There is no understanding a word of it.  Besides, if she does play so very well, you know, it is no more than she is obliged to do, because she will have to teach.  The Coxes were wondering last night whether she would get into any great family.  How did you think the Coxes looked?”

“Just as they always do—­very vulgar.”

“They told me something,” said Harriet rather hesitatingly; “but it is nothing of any consequence.”

Emma was obliged to ask what they had told her, though fearful of its producing Mr. Elton.

“They told me—­that Mr. Martin dined with them last Saturday.”

“Oh!”

“He came to their father upon some business, and he asked him to stay to dinner.”

“Oh!”

“They talked a great deal about him, especially Anne Cox.  I do not know what she meant, but she asked me if I thought I should go and stay there again next summer.”

“She meant to be impertinently curious, just as such an Anne Cox should be.”

“She said he was very agreeable the day he dined there.  He sat by her at dinner.  Miss Nash thinks either of the Coxes would be very glad to marry him.”

“Very likely.—­I think they are, without exception, the most vulgar girls in Highbury.”

Harriet had business at Ford’s.—­Emma thought it most prudent to go with her.  Another accidental meeting with the Martins was possible, and in her present state, would be dangerous.

Harriet, tempted by every thing and swayed by half a word, was always very long at a purchase; and while she was still hanging over muslins and changing her mind, Emma went to the door for amusement.—­Much could not be hoped from the traffic of even the busiest part of Highbury;—­ Mr. Perry walking hastily by, Mr. William Cox letting himself in at the office-door, Mr. Cole’s carriage-horses returning from exercise, or a stray letter-boy on an obstinate mule, were the liveliest objects she could presume to expect; and when her eyes fell only on the butcher with his tray, a tidy old woman travelling homewards from shop with her full basket, two curs quarrelling over a dirty bone, and a string of dawdling children round the baker’s little bow-window eyeing the gingerbread, she knew she had no reason to complain, and was amused enough; quite enough still to stand at the door.  A mind lively and at ease, can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer.

She looked down the Randalls road.  The scene enlarged; two persons appeared; Mrs. Weston and her son-in-law; they were walking into Highbury;—­to Hartfield of course.  They were stopping, however, in the first place at Mrs. Bates’s; whose house was a little nearer Randalls than Ford’s; and had all but knocked, when Emma caught their eye.—­Immediately they crossed the road and came forward to her; and the agreeableness of yesterday’s engagement seemed to give fresh pleasure to the present meeting.  Mrs. Weston informed her that she was going to call on the Bateses, in order to hear the new instrument.

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