Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

“I often feel concern,” said she, “that I dare not make our carriage more useful on such occasions.  It is not that I am without the wish; but you know how impossible my father would deem it that James should put-to for such a purpose.”

“Quite out of the question, quite out of the question,” he replied;—­ “but you must often wish it, I am sure.”  And he smiled with such seeming pleasure at the conviction, that she must proceed another step.

“This present from the Campbells,” said she—­“this pianoforte is very kindly given.”

“Yes,” he replied, and without the smallest apparent embarrassment.—­ “But they would have done better had they given her notice of it.  Surprizes are foolish things.  The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.  I should have expected better judgment in Colonel Campbell.”

From that moment, Emma could have taken her oath that Mr. Knightley had had no concern in giving the instrument.  But whether he were entirely free from peculiar attachment—­whether there were no actual preference—­remained a little longer doubtful.  Towards the end of Jane’s second song, her voice grew thick.

“That will do,” said he, when it was finished, thinking aloud—­ “you have sung quite enough for one evening—­now be quiet.”

Another song, however, was soon begged for.  “One more;—­they would not fatigue Miss Fairfax on any account, and would only ask for one more.”  And Frank Churchill was heard to say, “I think you could manage this without effort; the first part is so very trifling.  The strength of the song falls on the second.”

Mr. Knightley grew angry.

“That fellow,” said he, indignantly, “thinks of nothing but shewing off his own voice.  This must not be.”  And touching Miss Bates, who at that moment passed near—­“Miss Bates, are you mad, to let your niece sing herself hoarse in this manner?  Go, and interfere.  They have no mercy on her.”

Miss Bates, in her real anxiety for Jane, could hardly stay even to be grateful, before she stept forward and put an end to all farther singing.  Here ceased the concert part of the evening, for Miss Woodhouse and Miss Fairfax were the only young lady performers; but soon (within five minutes) the proposal of dancing—­ originating nobody exactly knew where—­was so effectually promoted by Mr. and Mrs. Cole, that every thing was rapidly clearing away, to give proper space.  Mrs. Weston, capital in her country-dances, was seated, and beginning an irresistible waltz; and Frank Churchill, coming up with most becoming gallantry to Emma, had secured her hand, and led her up to the top.

While waiting till the other young people could pair themselves off, Emma found time, in spite of the compliments she was receiving on her voice and her taste, to look about, and see what became of Mr. Knightley.  This would be a trial.  He was no dancer in general.  If he were to be very alert in engaging Jane Fairfax now, it might augur something.  There was no immediate appearance.  No; he was talking to Mrs. Cole—­ he was looking on unconcerned; Jane was asked by somebody else, and he was still talking to Mrs. Cole.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.