Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

The party was rather large, as it included one other family, a proper unobjectionable country family, whom the Coles had the advantage of naming among their acquaintance, and the male part of Mr. Cox’s family, the lawyer of Highbury.  The less worthy females were to come in the evening, with Miss Bates, Miss Fairfax, and Miss Smith; but already, at dinner, they were too numerous for any subject of conversation to be general; and, while politics and Mr. Elton were talked over, Emma could fairly surrender all her attention to the pleasantness of her neighbour.  The first remote sound to which she felt herself obliged to attend, was the name of Jane Fairfax.  Mrs. Cole seemed to be relating something of her that was expected to be very interesting.  She listened, and found it well worth listening to.  That very dear part of Emma, her fancy, received an amusing supply.  Mrs. Cole was telling that she had been calling on Miss Bates, and as soon as she entered the room had been struck by the sight of a pianoforte—­a very elegant looking instrument—­not a grand, but a large-sized square pianoforte; and the substance of the story, the end of all the dialogue which ensued of surprize, and inquiry, and congratulations on her side, and explanations on Miss Bates’s, was, that this pianoforte had arrived from Broadwood’s the day before, to the great astonishment of both aunt and niece—­entirely unexpected; that at first, by Miss Bates’s account, Jane herself was quite at a loss, quite bewildered to think who could possibly have ordered it—­ but now, they were both perfectly satisfied that it could be from only one quarter;—­of course it must be from Colonel Campbell.

“One can suppose nothing else,” added Mrs. Cole, “and I was only surprized that there could ever have been a doubt.  But Jane, it seems, had a letter from them very lately, and not a word was said about it.  She knows their ways best; but I should not consider their silence as any reason for their not meaning to make the present.  They might chuse to surprize her.”

Mrs. Cole had many to agree with her; every body who spoke on the subject was equally convinced that it must come from Colonel Campbell, and equally rejoiced that such a present had been made; and there were enough ready to speak to allow Emma to think her own way, and still listen to Mrs. Cole.

“I declare, I do not know when I have heard any thing that has given me more satisfaction!—­It always has quite hurt me that Jane Fairfax, who plays so delightfully, should not have an instrument.  It seemed quite a shame, especially considering how many houses there are where fine instruments are absolutely thrown away.  This is like giving ourselves a slap, to be sure! and it was but yesterday I was telling Mr. Cole, I really was ashamed to look at our new grand pianoforte in the drawing-room, while I do not know one note from another, and our little girls, who are but just beginning, perhaps may never make any

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook