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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

But she had made up her mind how to meet this presumption so many weeks before it appeared, that when the insult came at last, it found her very differently affected.  Donwell and Randalls had received their invitation, and none had come for her father and herself; and Mrs. Weston’s accounting for it with “I suppose they will not take the liberty with you; they know you do not dine out,” was not quite sufficient.  She felt that she should like to have had the power of refusal; and afterwards, as the idea of the party to be assembled there, consisting precisely of those whose society was dearest to her, occurred again and again, she did not know that she might not have been tempted to accept.  Harriet was to be there in the evening, and the Bateses.  They had been speaking of it as they walked about Highbury the day before, and Frank Churchill had most earnestly lamented her absence.  Might not the evening end in a dance? had been a question of his.  The bare possibility of it acted as a farther irritation on her spirits; and her being left in solitary grandeur, even supposing the omission to be intended as a compliment, was but poor comfort.

It was the arrival of this very invitation while the Westons were at Hartfield, which made their presence so acceptable; for though her first remark, on reading it, was that “of course it must be declined,” she so very soon proceeded to ask them what they advised her to do, that their advice for her going was most prompt and successful.

She owned that, considering every thing, she was not absolutely without inclination for the party.  The Coles expressed themselves so properly—­there was so much real attention in the manner of it—­ so much consideration for her father.  “They would have solicited the honour earlier, but had been waiting the arrival of a folding-screen from London, which they hoped might keep Mr. Woodhouse from any draught of air, and therefore induce him the more readily to give them the honour of his company.”  Upon the whole, she was very persuadable; and it being briefly settled among themselves how it might be done without neglecting his comfort—­how certainly Mrs. Goddard, if not Mrs. Bates, might be depended on for bearing him company—­ Mr. Woodhouse was to be talked into an acquiescence of his daughter’s going out to dinner on a day now near at hand, and spending the whole evening away from him.  As for his going, Emma did not wish him to think it possible, the hours would be too late, and the party too numerous.  He was soon pretty well resigned.

“I am not fond of dinner-visiting,” said he—­“I never was.  No more is Emma.  Late hours do not agree with us.  I am sorry Mr. and Mrs. Cole should have done it.  I think it would be much better if they would come in one afternoon next summer, and take their tea with us—­take us in their afternoon walk; which they might do, as our hours are so reasonable, and yet get home without being out in the damp of the

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