Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.

Mr. Weston, on his side, added a virtue to the account which must have some weight.  He gave her to understand that Frank admired her extremely—­thought her very beautiful and very charming; and with so much to be said for him altogether, she found she must not judge him harshly.  As Mrs. Weston observed, “all young people would have their little whims.”

There was one person among his new acquaintance in Surry, not so leniently disposed.  In general he was judged, throughout the parishes of Donwell and Highbury, with great candour; liberal allowances were made for the little excesses of such a handsome young man—­ one who smiled so often and bowed so well; but there was one spirit among them not to be softened, from its power of censure, by bows or smiles—­Mr. Knightley.  The circumstance was told him at Hartfield; for the moment, he was silent; but Emma heard him almost immediately afterwards say to himself, over a newspaper he held in his hand, “Hum! just the trifling, silly fellow I took him for.”  She had half a mind to resent; but an instant’s observation convinced her that it was really said only to relieve his own feelings, and not meant to provoke; and therefore she let it pass.

Although in one instance the bearers of not good tidings, Mr. and Mrs. Weston’s visit this morning was in another respect particularly opportune.  Something occurred while they were at Hartfield, to make Emma want their advice; and, which was still more lucky, she wanted exactly the advice they gave.

This was the occurrence:—­The Coles had been settled some years in Highbury, and were very good sort of people—­friendly, liberal, and unpretending; but, on the other hand, they were of low origin, in trade, and only moderately genteel.  On their first coming into the country, they had lived in proportion to their income, quietly, keeping little company, and that little unexpensively; but the last year or two had brought them a considerable increase of means—­ the house in town had yielded greater profits, and fortune in general had smiled on them.  With their wealth, their views increased; their want of a larger house, their inclination for more company.  They added to their house, to their number of servants, to their expenses of every sort; and by this time were, in fortune and style of living, second only to the family at Hartfield.  Their love of society, and their new dining-room, prepared every body for their keeping dinner-company; and a few parties, chiefly among the single men, had already taken place.  The regular and best families Emma could hardly suppose they would presume to invite—­ neither Donwell, nor Hartfield, nor Randalls.  Nothing should tempt her to go, if they did; and she regretted that her father’s known habits would be giving her refusal less meaning than she could wish.  The Coles were very respectable in their way, but they ought to be taught that it was not for them to arrange the terms on which the superior families would visit them.  This lesson, she very much feared, they would receive only from herself; she had little hope of Mr. Knightley, none of Mr. Weston.

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Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.