Emma eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 469 pages of information about Emma.
himself to have always felt the sort of interest in the country which none but one’s own country gives, and the greatest curiosity to visit it.  That he should never have been able to indulge so amiable a feeling before, passed suspiciously through Emma’s brain; but still, if it were a falsehood, it was a pleasant one, and pleasantly handled.  His manner had no air of study or exaggeration.  He did really look and speak as if in a state of no common enjoyment.

Their subjects in general were such as belong to an opening acquaintance.  On his side were the inquiries,—­“Was she a horsewoman?—­Pleasant rides?—­ Pleasant walks?—­Had they a large neighbourhood?—­Highbury, perhaps, afforded society enough?—­There were several very pretty houses in and about it.—­Balls—­had they balls?—­Was it a musical society?”

But when satisfied on all these points, and their acquaintance proportionably advanced, he contrived to find an opportunity, while their two fathers were engaged with each other, of introducing his mother-in-law, and speaking of her with so much handsome praise, so much warm admiration, so much gratitude for the happiness she secured to his father, and her very kind reception of himself, as was an additional proof of his knowing how to please—­ and of his certainly thinking it worth while to try to please her.  He did not advance a word of praise beyond what she knew to be thoroughly deserved by Mrs. Weston; but, undoubtedly he could know very little of the matter.  He understood what would be welcome; he could be sure of little else.  “His father’s marriage,” he said, “had been the wisest measure, every friend must rejoice in it; and the family from whom he had received such a blessing must be ever considered as having conferred the highest obligation on him.”

He got as near as he could to thanking her for Miss Taylor’s merits, without seeming quite to forget that in the common course of things it was to be rather supposed that Miss Taylor had formed Miss Woodhouse’s character, than Miss Woodhouse Miss Taylor’s.  And at last, as if resolved to qualify his opinion completely for travelling round to its object, he wound it all up with astonishment at the youth and beauty of her person.

“Elegant, agreeable manners, I was prepared for,” said he; “but I confess that, considering every thing, I had not expected more than a very tolerably well-looking woman of a certain age; I did not know that I was to find a pretty young woman in Mrs. Weston.”

“You cannot see too much perfection in Mrs. Weston for my feelings,” said Emma; “were you to guess her to be eighteen, I should listen with pleasure; but she would be ready to quarrel with you for using such words.  Don’t let her imagine that you have spoken of her as a pretty young woman.”

“I hope I should know better,” he replied; “no, depend upon it, (with a gallant bow,) that in addressing Mrs. Weston I should understand whom I might praise without any danger of being thought extravagant in my terms.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Emma from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook