Machiavelli, Volume I eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 391 pages of information about Machiavelli, Volume I.

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NICHOLAS MACHIAVEL’S

PRINCE

TRANSLATED
OUT OF ITALIAN INTO ENGLISH BY

E.D.

WITH SOME ANIMADVERSIONS
NOTING AND TAXING
HIS ERRORS

1640

TO THE MOST
NOBLE AND ILLUSTRIOUS,
JAMES Duke of Lenox, Earle of March, Baron of Setrington, Darnly,
Terbanten, and Methuen, Lord Great Chamberlain and Admiral of Scotland,
Knight of the most Noble Order of the Garter, and one of his Majesties
most honourable Privy Counsel in both kingdomes.

Poysons are not all of that malignant and noxious quality, that as destructives of Nature, they are utterly to be abhord; but we find many, nay most of them have their medicinal uses.  This book carries its poyson and malice in it; yet mee thinks the judicious peruser may honestly make use of it in the actions of his life, with advantage.  The Lamprey, they say, hath a venemous string runs all along the back of it; take that out, and it is serv’d in for a choyce dish to dainty palates; Epictetus the Philosopher, sayes, Every thing hath two handles, as the fire brand, it may be taken up at one end in the bare hand without hurt:  the other being laid hold on, will cleave to the very flesh, and the smart of it will pierce even to the heart.  Sin hath the condition of the fiery end; the touch of it is wounding with griefe unto the soule:  nay it is worse; one sin goes not alone but hath many consequences.  Your Grace may find the truth of this in your perusal of this Author:  your judgement shall easily direct you in finding out the good uses of him:  I have pointed at his chiefest errors with my best endeavors, and have devoted them to your Graces service:  which if you shall accept and protect, I shall remain

Your Graces humble and devoted servant,

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Machiavelli, Volume I from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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