Personal Reminiscences of Early Days in California with Other Sketches; To Which Is Added the Story of His Attempted Assassination by a Former Associate on the Supreme Bench of the State eBook

George Congdon Gorham
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 412 pages of information about Personal Reminiscences of Early Days in California with Other Sketches; To Which Is Added the Story of His Attempted Assassination by a Former Associate on the Supreme Bench of the State.

Chapter X President Cleveland refuses to Pardon Terry—­False
Statements of Terry Refuted.

Chapter XI Terry’s continued Threats to Kill Justice Field—­Return
of the Latter to California in 1889.

Chapter XII Further Proceedings in the State Court.—­Judge
Sullivan’s Decision Reversed.

Chapter XIII Attempted Assassination of Justice Field, Resulting in
Terry’s own Death at the Hands of a Deputy United
States Marshal.

Chapter XIV Sarah Althea Terry Charges Justice Field and Deputy
Marshal Neagle with Murder.

Chapter XV Justice Field’s Arrest and Petition for Release on
Habeas Corpus.

Chapter XVI Judge Terry’s Funeral—­Refusal of the Supreme Court
of California to Adjourn on the Occasion.

Chapter XVII Habeas Corpus Proceedings in Justice Field’s Case.

Chapter XVIII Habeas Corpus Proceedings in Neagle’s Case.

Chapter XIX Expressions of Public Opinion.

Chapter XX The Appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States,
and the Second Trial of Sarah Althea’s Divorce Case.

Chapter XXI Concluding Observations.

* * * * *

WHY AND HOW I CAME TO CALIFORNIA.

Some months previous to the Mexican War, my brother David Dudley Field, of New York City, wrote two articles for the Democratic Review upon the subject of the Northwestern Boundary between the territory of the United States and the British Possessions.  One of these appeared in the June, and the other in the November number of the Review for 1845.[1] While writing these articles he had occasion to examine several works on Oregon and California, and, among others, that of Greenhow, then recently published, and thus became familiar with the geography and political history of the Pacific Coast.  The next Spring, and soon after the war broke out, in the course of a conversation upon its probable results, he remarked, that if he were a young man, he would go to San Francisco; that he was satisfied peace would never be concluded without our acquiring the harbor upon which it was situated; that there was no other good harbor on the coast, and that, in his opinion, that town would, at no distant day, become a great city.  He also remarked that if I would go he would furnish the means, not only for the journey, but also for the purchase of land at San Francisco and in its vicinity.  This conversation was the first germ of my project of coming to California.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Personal Reminiscences of Early Days in California with Other Sketches; To Which Is Added the Story of His Attempted Assassination by a Former Associate on the Supreme Bench of the State from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook