Reading Made Easy for Foreigners - Third Reader eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 107 pages of information about Reading Made Easy for Foreigners.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident; That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that, to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that, whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such forms, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.”

SELECTION III

  BE TRUE

  Thou must be true thyself,
    If thou the truth wouldst teach;
  Thy soul must overflow, if thou
    Another’s soul would’st reach;
  It needs the overflow of hearts
    To give the lips full speech.

  Think truly, and thy thoughts
    Shall the world’s famine feed;
  Speak truly, and each word of thine
    Shall be a fruitful seed;
  Live truly, and thy life shall be
    A great and noble creed.

  Anonymous.

LESSON IX

NEWFOUNDLAND

Newfoundland is an island about the size of New York State.  It belongs to England.  The cod fisheries there are very extensive.

The people of Newfoundland are strong, healthy and industrious.  They are law-abiding, and serious; crime is very rare among them.  Their kindness and hospitality to strangers who visit the country are proverbial.  Kindness to the poor and unfortunate is a marked feature in the character of the people.  When business is poor they are ready to share their last morsel with those in distress.

The fishermen are the working classes of the country.  During the height of the fishery season, and when fish are abundant, their labors are severe; but during winter they are for the most part in a condition of enforced idleness.  Much of the work of curing the fish is done by women and girls, and their labors are often very heavy.  When the fisheries are over, there are boats, nets, etc., to repair, stages to look after, and fuel to be cut in the woods and hauled over the snow.

If the fishery has been successful, then the fisherman has a balance coming to him after paying for his summer supplies, and is enabled to lay in a stock of provisions for the winter.

Winter is the season for enjoyment among the fishermen.  This season for fireside enjoyments, home-born pleasures, is welcome.  They have their simple social enjoyments of various kinds.  Dancing is a favorite winter amusement among the fishermen and their families.  Weddings are celebrated with great festivity.

Newfoundland is often regarded as the very paradise of sportsmen.  Its countless lakes and ponds abound with trout of the finest description, and these bodies of water are the abodes of the wild goose, the wild duck, and other fresh-water fowl.

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Reading Made Easy for Foreigners - Third Reader from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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