Daddy-Long-Legs eBook

Jean Webster
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 109 pages of information about Daddy-Long-Legs.

PS.  I hope you never touch alcohol, Daddy?  It does dreadful things to your liver.

Wednesday

Dear Daddy-Long-Legs,

I’ve changed my name.

I’m still `Jerusha’ in the catalogue, but I’m `Judy’ everywhere else.  It’s really too bad, isn’t it, to have to give yourself the only pet name you ever had?  I didn’t quite make up the Judy though.  That’s what Freddy Perkins used to call me before he could talk plainly.

I wish Mrs. Lippett would use a little more ingenuity about choosing babies’ names.  She gets the last names out of the telephone book—­ you’ll find Abbott on the first page—­and she picks the Christian names up anywhere; she got Jerusha from a tombstone.  I’ve always hated it; but I rather like Judy.  It’s such a silly name.  It belongs to the kind of girl I’m not—­a sweet little blue-eyed thing, petted and spoiled by all the family, who romps her way through life without any cares.  Wouldn’t it be nice to be like that?  Whatever faults I may have, no one can ever accuse me of having been spoiled by my family!  But it’s great fun to pretend I’ve been.  In the future please always address me as Judy.

Do you want to know something?  I have three pairs of kid gloves.  I’ve had kid mittens before from the Christmas tree, but never real kid gloves with five fingers.  I take them out and try them on every little while.  It’s all I can do not to wear them to classes.

(Dinner bell.  Goodbye.)

Friday

What do you think, Daddy?  The English instructor said that my last paper shows an unusual amount of originality.  She did, truly.  Those were her words.  It doesn’t seem possible, does it, considering the eighteen years of training that I’ve had?  The aim of the John Grier Home (as you doubtless know and heartily approve of) is to turn the ninety-seven orphans into ninety-seven twins.

The unusual artistic ability which I exhibit was developed at an early age through drawing chalk pictures of Mrs. Lippett on the woodshed door.

I hope that I don’t hurt your feelings when I criticize the home of my youth?  But you have the upper hand, you know, for if I become too impertinent, you can always stop payment of your cheques.  That isn’t a very polite thing to say—­but you can’t expect me to have any manners; a foundling asylum isn’t a young ladies’ finishing school.

You know, Daddy, it isn’t the work that is going to be hard in college.  It’s the play.  Half the time I don’t know what the girls are talking about; their jokes seem to relate to a past that every one but me has shared.  I’m a foreigner in the world and I don’t understand the language.  It’s a miserable feeling.  I’ve had it all my life.  At the high school the girls would stand in groups and just look at me.  I was queer and different and everybody knew it.  I could feel `John Grier Home’ written on my face.  And then a few charitable ones would make a point of coming up and saying something polite.  I hated every one of them—­the charitable ones most of all.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Daddy-Long-Legs from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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