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The High School Failures eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 108 pages of information about The High School Failures.

22.  VanDenburg, J.K. The Elimination of Pupils from Public Secondary Schools, p. 113.

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CHAPTER IV

HOW MUCH IS THE GRADUATION OR THE PERSISTENCE IN SCHOOL CONDITIONED BY THE OCCURRENCE OR THE NUMBER OF FAILURES?

1.  COMPARISON OF THE FAILING AND THE NON-FAILING GROUPS IN REFERENCE TO GRADUATION AND PERSISTENCE

It has been noted in section 1 of Chapter II that 58.1 per cent of all the graduates have school failures.  Here we mean to carry the analysis and comparison in reference to graduation and failure somewhat further.  To this end the following distribution is significant.

DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS IN REFERENCE TO FAILURE AND GRADUATION

The Non-failing                  The Failing
Pupils—­Graduating              Pupils—­Graduating
Totals       2568      811 (31.5%)           3573    1125 (31.5%)
Boys         1001      307 (30.6%)           1645     489 (29.7%)
Girls        1567      504 (32.1%)           1928     639 (33.0%)

We have presented here the numbers that graduate without failures, together with the total group to which they belong, and the same for the graduates who have failed.  By a mere process of subtraction we may determine the number of non-graduates, as well as the number of these that fail, and then compute the percentage of the non-graduates who fail.  Thus we get 58.2 per cent (boys—­62.5, girls—­54.9) as the percentage of the non-graduates failing.  It is apparent at once that this is almost identical with the percentage of failure for the ones who graduate (Chapter II), but for the non-graduates the boys and girls are a little further apart.  It may be remarked in this connection that no effort was made to include any of the 808 non-credited pupils among the ones who fail.  The inclusion of 60 per cent of this number as potentially failing pupils, as was done in Chapter II, will raise the above percentage of failing non-graduates by 11.5 per cent.

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