Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

Charles Edwin Bennett
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 240 pages of information about New Latin Grammar.
77, 4, a. vir, decl., 23. ——­ gen. plu. of nouns compounded with, 25, 6, b). virile seces, constr., 185, 1. virus, gender of, 26, 2. vis, decl., 41. viscera, used in plu. only, 56, 3.  Vocative case, 17; 19, 1; ——­ of Greek proper names in -as, 47, 4; ——­ of adjs. in -ius, 63, 1; 171; ——­ in -i for -ie, 25, 1; ——­ position of, 350, 3.  Voiced sounds, 2, 3, a).  Voiced consonants, 2, 3, b).  Voiceless consonants, 2, 3, a).  Voices, 94; 256; ——­ middle voice, 256, 1.  Volitive subjunctive, 272 f. volnus, spelling, 9, 1. volo, 130; ——­ with inf., 331, IV and a; 270, 2, a; ——­ with subjv., 296, 1, a. volt, spelling, 9, 1. voltus, spelling, 8, 1. volucer, decl., 68, 1. voluntate, 220, 2. -volus, comparison of adjs. in, 71, 5 Vowels, 2, 1; ——­ sounds of the, 3, 1; ——­ quantity of, 5, A; ——­ contraction of, 7, 2; ——­ parasitic, 7, 3.  Vowel changes, 7. vulgus, gender of, 26, 2. -vum, -vus, decl. of nouns in, 24.

W.

Want, verbs and adjs. of, w. abl., 214, 1, c; d.  Way by which, abl. of, 218, 9.  We, editorial, 242, 3.  Whole, gen. of, 201.  Wills, use of fut. imperative in, 281, 1, b.  Winds, gender of names of, 15, 1.  Wish, clauses with dum, etc., expressing a, 310.  Wishes, subjunctive in, 279; ——­ see Optative subjunctive.  Wishing, verbs of, with subst. clause 296, 1; ——­ with obj. inf., 331, IV.  Word-formation, 146 f.  Word-order, 348 f.  Word questions, 162, 1.

X.

x, 2, 9; ——­ = cs and gs, 32. -x, decl. of monosyllables in, preceded by one or more cons., 40, 1, b); ——­ gender of nouns in -x of 3d decl., 43, 2; ——­ exceptions, 45, 4.

Y.

y, 1, 1. 
Yes, how expressed, 162, 5. 
‘You,’ indefinite, 356, 3; 280, 3; 302, 2.

Z.

z, 1, 1; 2, 9. 
Zeugma, 374, 2, a).

* * * * *

FOOTNOTES

[1] Sometimes also called Aryan or Indo-Germanic.

[2] Cuneiform means “wedge-shaped.”  The name applies to the form of the strokes of which the characters consist.

[3] The name Zend is often given to this.

[4] For ‘voiceless,’ ‘surd,’ ‘hard,’ or ‘tenuis’ are sometimes used.

[5] For ‘voiced,’ ‘sonant,’ ‘soft,’ or ‘media’ are sometimes used.

[6] In this book, long vowels are indicated by a horizontal line above them; as, a, i, o, etc.  Vowels not thus marked are short.  Occasionally a curve is set above short vowels; as, e, u.

[7] To avoid confusion, the quantity of syllables is not indicated by any sign.

[8] But if the l or r introduces the second part of a compound, the preceding syllable is always long; as, abrumpo.

[9] Only the simplest and most obvious of these are here treated.

[10] Only the simplest and most obvious of these are here treated.

[11] The great majority of all Latin nouns come under this category.  The principles for determining their gender are given under the separate declensions.

Follow Us on Facebook