Last Days of Pompeii eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Last Days of Pompeii.

Chapter II

The blind flower-girl, and the beauty of fashionThe Athenian’s confessionThe reader’s introduction to Arbaces of Egypt.

Talking lightly on a thousand matters, the two young men sauntered through the streets; they were now in that quarter which was filled with the gayest shops, their open interiors all and each radiant with the gaudy yet harmonious colors of frescoes, inconceivably varied in fancy and design.  The sparkling fountains, that at every vista threw upwards their grateful spray in the summer air; the crowd of passengers, or rather loiterers, mostly clad in robes of the Tyrian dye; the gay groups collected round each more attractive shop; the slaves passing to and fro with buckets of bronze, cast in the most graceful shapes, and borne upon their heads; the country girls stationed at frequent intervals with baskets of blushing fruit, and flowers more alluring to the ancient Italians than to their descendants (with whom, indeed, “latet anguis in herba,” a disease seems lurking in every violet and rose); the numerous haunts which fulfilled with that idle people the office of cafes and clubs at this day; the shops, where on shelves of marble were ranged the vases of wine and oil, and before whose thresholds, seats, protected from the sun by a purple awning, invited the weary to rest and the indolent to lounge—­made a scene of such glowing and vivacious excitement, as might well give the Athenian spirit of Glaucus an excuse for its susceptibility to joy.

‘Talk to me no more of Rome,’ said he to Clodius.  ’Pleasure is too stately and ponderous in those mighty walls:  even in the precincts of the court—­even in the Golden House of Nero, and the incipient glories of the palace of Titus, there is a certain dulness of magnificence—­the eye aches—­the spirit is wearied; besides, my Clodius, we are discontented when we compare the enormous luxury and wealth of others with the mediocrity of our own state.  But here we surrender ourselves easily to pleasure, and we have the brilliancy of luxury without the lassitude of its pomp.’

’It was from that feeling that you chose your summer retreat at Pompeii?’

’It was.  I prefer it to Baiae:  I grant the charms of the latter, but I love not the pedants who resort there, and who seem to weigh out their pleasures by the drachm.’

’Yet you are fond of the learned, too; and as for poetry, why, your house is literally eloquent with AEschylus and Homer, the epic and the drama.’

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Last Days of Pompeii from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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