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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Last Days of Pompeii.

Diomed ordered his slaves to carry down into the subterranean gallery, before described, a profusion of food and oil for lights; and there Julia, Clodius, the mother and her babe, the greater part of the slaves, and some frightened visitors and clients of the neighborhood, sought their shelter.

Chapter VII

The progress of the destruction.

The cloud, which had scattered so deep a murkiness over the day, had now settled into a solid and impenetrable mass.  It resembled less even the thickest gloom of a night in the open air than the close and blind darkness of some narrow room.  But in proportion as the blackness gathered, did the lightnings around Vesuvius increase in their vivid and scorching glare.  Nor was their horrible beauty confined to the usual hues of fire; no rainbow ever rivalled their varying and prodigal dyes.  Now brightly blue as the most azure depth of a southern sky—­now of a livid and snakelike green, darting restlessly to and fro as the folds of an enormous serpent—­now of a lurid and intolerable crimson, gushing forth through the columns of smoke, far and wide, and lighting up the whole city from arch to arch—­then suddenly dying into a sickly paleness, like the ghost of their own life!

In the pauses of the showers, you heard the rumbling of the earth beneath, and the groaning waves of the tortured sea; or, lower still, and audible but to the watch of intensest fear, the grinding and hissing murmur of the escaping gases through the chasms of the distant mountain.  Sometimes the cloud appeared to break from its solid mass, and, by the lightning, to assume quaint and vast mimicries of human or of monster shapes, striding across the gloom, hurtling one upon the other, and vanishing swiftly into the turbulent abyss of shade; so that, to the eyes and fancies of the affrighted wanderers, the unsubstantial vapors were as the bodily forms of gigantic foes—­the agents of terror and of death.

The ashes in many places were already knee-deep; and the boiling showers which came from the steaming breath of the volcano forced their way into the houses, bearing with them a strong and suffocating vapor.  In some places, immense fragments of rock, hurled upon the house roofs, bore down along the streets masses of confused ruin, which yet more and more, with every hour, obstructed the way; and, as the day advanced, the motion of the earth was more sensibly felt—­the footing seemed to slide and creep—­nor could chariot or litter be kept steady, even on the most level ground.

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