Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 542 pages of information about Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12).

So next morning the Enchanted Horse was brought out into the crowded square, and the Princess was mounted upon its back.  Then the disguised Prince placed four braziers of burning coals round the horse and threw into them a perfume of a most delicious scent.  The smoke of the perfume rose in thick clouds, almost hiding the Princess, and at that moment the Prince leaped into the saddle behind her, turned the peg, and sailed away into the blue sky.

But as he swept past the Sultan, he cried aloud, “Sultan of Cashmere, next time thou dost wish to wed a Princess, ask her first if she be willing to wed thee.”

So this was the manner in which the Prince of Persia carried off the Princess of Bengal for the second time.  The Enchanted Horse never stopped until it had carried them safely back to Persia, and there they were married amid great rejoicings.

But what became of the Enchanted Horse?  Ah! that is a question which no one can answer.

III

SINDBAD THE SAILOR

In the city of Bagdad, far away in Persia, there lived a poor man called Hindbad.  He was a porter, and one hot afternoon, as he was carrying a very heavy load, he stopped to rest in a quiet street near a beautiful house which he had never seen before.  The pavement outside was sprinkled with rose-water, which felt very cool and pleasant to his hot, weary feet, and from the open windows came the most delicious scents which perfumed all the air.

Hindbad wondered who lived in this beautiful house, and presently he went up to one of the splendidly dressed servants, who was standing at the door, and asked to whom it belonged.  The servant stared in amazement.

“Dost thou indeed live in Bagdad and knowest not my master’s name?” he said.  “He is the great Sindbad the Sailor, the man who has sailed all round the world, and who has had the most wonderful adventures under the sun.”

Now Hindbad had often heard of this wonderful man and of his great riches, and as he looked at the beautiful palace and saw the splendidly dressed servants it made him feel sad and envious.  As he turned away sighing, to take up his load again, he looked up into the blue sky, and said aloud: 

“What a difference there is between this man’s lot and mine.  He has all that he wants, and nothing to do but to spend money and enjoy a pleasant life, while I have to work hard to get dry bread enough to keep myself and my children alive.  What has he done that he should be so lucky, and what have I done that I should be so miserable?”

Just then one of the servants touched him on the shoulder, and said to him:  “My noble master wishes to see thee, and has bidden me fetch thee to him.”

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Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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