Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 542 pages of information about Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12).

But when the Slave of the Lamp heard the order his face grew terrible with rage, and his eyes gleamed like burning coals.

“Vile wretch!” he shrieked, “have I not given thee all thy wishes, and now dost thou ask me to kill my master, and hang him as an ornament in thy palace?  Thou deservest truly to die; but I know that the request cometh not from thine own heart, but was the suggestion of that wicked Magician who pretends to be a holy woman.”

With these words the Genie vanished, and.  Aladdin went at once to the room where the Princess was awaiting him.

“I have a headache,” he said.  “Call the holy woman, that she may place her hand upon my forehead and ease the pain.”

But the moment that the false Fatima appeared Aladdin sprang up and plunged his dagger into that evil heart.

“What hast thou done?” cried the Princess.  “Alas! thou hast slain the holy woman.”

“This is no holy woman,” answered Aladdin, “but an evil Magician whose purpose was to destroy us both.”

So Aladdin was saved from the wicked design of the two Magicians, and there was no one left to disturb his peace.  He and the Princess lived together in great happiness for many years, and when the Sultan died they succeeded to the throne, and ruled both wisely and well.  And so there was great peace throughout the land.

II

THE ENCHANTED HORSE

It was New Year’s day in Persia, the most splendid feast-day of all the year, and the King had been entertained, hour after hour, by the wonderful shows prepared for him by his people.  Evening was drawing on and the court was just about to retire, when an Indian appeared, leading a horse which he wished to show to the King.  It was not a real horse, but it was so wonderfully made that it looked exactly as if it were alive.

“Your Majesty,” cried the Indian, as he bowed himself to the ground, “I beg thou wilt look upon this wonder.  Nothing thou hast seen to-day can equal this horse of mine.  I have only to mount upon its back and wish myself in any part of the world, and it carries me there in a few minutes.”  Now the King of Persia was very fond of curious and clever things, so he looked at the horse with great interest.

“It seems only a common horse,” he said, “but thou shalt show us what it can do.”

Then he pointed to a distant mountain, and bade the Indian to fetch a branch from the palm-trees which grew near its foot.

The Indian vaulted into the saddle, turned a little peg in the horse’s neck, and in a moment was flying so swiftly through the air that he soon disappeared from sight.  In less than a quarter of an hour he reappeared, and laid the palm-branch at the King’s feet.

“Thou art right,” cried the King; “thy enchanted horse is the most wonderful thing I have yet seen.  What is its price?  I must have it for my own.”

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Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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