Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 542 pages of information about Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12).

Now Aladdin had meanwhile prepared a powder which he directed the Princess to place in her own wine-cup.  So when the Magician returned with the African wine, she filled her cup and offered it to him in token of friendship.  The Magician drank it up eagerly, and scarcely had he finished when he dropped down dead.

Then Aladdin came out of the next chamber where he had hidden himself, and searched in the Magician’s robe until he found the Magic Lamp.  He rubbed it joyfully, and when the Genie appeared, ordered that the palace should be carried back to China, and set down in its own place.

The following morning, when the Sultan rose early, for he was too sad to take much rest, he went to the window to gaze on the place where Aladdin’s palace had once stood.  He rubbed his eyes, and stared wildly about.

“This must be a dream,” he cried, for there stood the palace in all its beauty, looking fairer than ever in the morning light.

Not a moment did the Sultan lose, but he rode over to the palace at once, and when he had embraced Aladdin and his daughter, they told him the whole story of the African Magician.  Then Aladdin showed him the dead body of the wicked old man, and there was peace between them once more.

But there was still trouble in store for Aladdin.  The African Magician had a younger brother who also dealt in magic, and who was if possible even more wicked than his elder brother.

Full of revenge, this younger brother started for China, determined to punish Aladdin and steal the Magic Lamp for himself.  As soon as he arrived he went in secret to the cell of a holy woman called Fatima, and obliged her to give him her robe and veil as a disguise.  Then to keep the secret safe he killed the poor woman.

Dressed in the robe and veil, the wicked Magician walked through the streets near Aladdin’s palace, and all the people as he passed by knelt and kissed his robe, for they thought he was indeed the holy woman.

As soon as the Princess heard that Fatima was passing by in the street, she sent and commanded her to be brought into the hall, and she treated the supposed holy woman with great respect and kindness, for she had often longed to see her.

“Is not this a fine hall?” she asked, as they sat together in the hall of the jeweled windows.

“It is indeed most beautiful,” answered the Magician, who kept his veil carefully down, “but to my mind there is one thing wanting.  If only thou couldst have a roc’s egg hung in the dome it would be perfect.”

As soon as the Princess heard these words she became discontented and miserable, and when Aladdin came in, she looked so sad that he at once asked what was the matter.

“I can never be happy until I have a roc’s egg hanging from the dome of the great hall,” she answered.

“In that case thou shalt soon be happy,” said Aladdin gaily, and taking down the lamp, he summoned the Genie.

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Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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