Stephen A. Douglas eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 492 pages of information about Stephen A. Douglas.

[Footnote 563:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., App. p. 544.]

[Footnote 564:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., App., p. 531.]

[Footnote 565:  Ibid., p. 545.]

[Footnote 566:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., App., p. 547.]

[Footnote 567:  Rhodes, History of the United States, II, p. 148.]

[Footnote 568:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., p. 1305.]

[Footnote 569:  Rhodes, History of the United States, II, pp. 103-106; 154-166.]

[Footnote 570:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., p. 1439.]

[Footnote 571:  Ibid., 35 Cong., 1 Sess., p. 22.]

[Footnote 572:  Ibid., p. 119.]

[Footnote 573:  Ibid., p. 119.]

[Footnote 574:  Senate Report, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., No. 198.]

[Footnote 575:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., App., p. 795.]

[Footnote 576:  Rhodes, History of the United States, II, pp. 194-195.]

[Footnote 577:  Senate Bill, No. 172, Section 3.]

[Footnote 578:  Senate Bill, No. 356, Section 13.]

[Footnote 579:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., App., p. 779.]

[Footnote 580:  Speech at Alton, Illinois, 1858.]

[Footnote 581:  Political Debates between Lincoln and Douglas, pp. 161 ff.]

[Footnote 582:  Globe, 35 Cong., 1 Sess., p. 22.]

[Footnote 583:  Ibid., App., p. 127.  Toombs also stated that the submission clause had been put in his bill in the first place by accident, and that it had been stricken from the bill at his suggestion.]

[Footnote 584:  The submission of State constitutions to a popular vote had not then become a general practice.]

[Footnote 585:  Rhodes, History of the United States, II, p. 195.]

[Footnote 586:  Globe, 34 Cong., 1 Sess., App., p. 844.]

[Footnote 587:  Globe, 35 Cong., 1 Sess., p. 21.]

[Footnote 588:  Sheahan, Douglas, p. 443.]

[Footnote 589:  Davidson and Stuve, History of Illinois, p. 650.]

[Footnote 590:  MS. Letter, Douglas to Sheahan, October 6, 1856.]

[Footnote 591:  Tribune Almanac, 1857.  The vote was as follows: 

    Buchanan 105,348
    Fremont 96,189
    Fillmore 37,444
]

BOOK III

THE IMPENDING CRISIS

CHAPTER XIV

THE PERSONAL EQUATION

Vast changes had passed over Illinois since Douglas set foot on its soil, a penniless boy with his fortune to make.  The frontier had been pushed back far beyond the northern boundary of the State; the Indians had disappeared; and the great military tract had been occupied by a thrifty, enterprising people of the same stock from which Douglas sprang.  In 1833, the center of political gravity lay far south of the

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Stephen A. Douglas from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.