A Lady of Quality eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 248 pages of information about A Lady of Quality.

After their mother’s death a youth desolate and strange indeed lay before them.  A spinster who was a poor relation was the only person of respectable breeding who ever came near them.  To save herself from genteel starvation, she had offered herself for the place of governess to them, though she was fitted for the position neither by education nor character.  Mistress Margery Wimpole was a poor, dull creature, having no wilful harm in her, but endowed with neither dignity nor wit.  She lived in fear of Sir Jeoffry, and in fear of the servants, who knew full well that she was an humble dependant, and treated her as one.  She hid away with her pupils’ in the bare school-room in the west wing, and taught them to spell and write and work samplers.  She herself knew no more.

The child who had cost her mother her life had no happier prospect than her sisters.  Her father felt her more an intruder than they had been, he being of the mind that to house and feed and clothe, howsoever poorly, these three burdens on him was a drain scarcely to be borne.  His wife had been a toast and not a fortune, and his estate not being great, he possessed no more than his drinking, roystering, and gambling made full demands upon.

The child was baptized Clorinda, and bred, so to speak, from her first hour, in the garret and the servants’ hall.  Once only did her father behold her during her infancy, which event was a mere accident, as he had expressed no wish to see her, and only came upon her in the nurse’s arms some weeks after her mother’s death.  ’Twas quite by chance.  The woman, who was young and buxom, had begun an intrigue with a groom, and having a mind to see him, was crossing the stable-yard, carrying her charge with her, when Sir Jeoffry came by to visit a horse.

The woman came plump upon him, entering a stable as he came out of it; she gave a frightened start, and almost let the child drop, at which it set up a strong, shrill cry, and thus Sir Jeoffry saw it, and seeing it, was thrown at once into a passion which expressed itself after the manner of all his emotion, and left the nurse quaking with fear.

“Thunder and damnation!” he exclaimed, as he strode away after the encounter; “’tis the ugliest yet.  A yellow-faced girl brat, with eyes like an owl’s in an ivy-bush, and with a voice like a very peacocks.  Another mawking, plain slut that no man will take off my hands.”

He did not see her again for six years.  But little wit was needed to learn that ’twas best to keep her out of his sight, as her sisters were kept, and this was done without difficulty, as he avoided the wing of the house where the children lived, as if it were stricken with the plague.

But the child Clorinda, it seemed, was of lustier stock than her older sisters, and this those about her soon found out to their grievous disturbance.  When Mother Posset had drawn her from under her dead mother’s body she had not left shrieking for an hour, but had kept up her fierce cries until the roof rang with them, and the old woman had jogged her about and beat her back in the hopes of stifling her, until she was exhausted and dismayed.  For the child would not be stilled, and seemed to have such strength and persistence in her as surely infant never showed before.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
A Lady of Quality from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook