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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 680 pages of information about The Lancashire Witches.

Word having gone forth of the midnight mass, all the ejected brethren flock to the abbey.  Some have toiled through miry and scarce passable roads.  Others have come down from the hills, and forded deep streams at the hazard of life, rather than go round by the far-off bridge, and arrive too late.  Others, who conceive themselves in peril from the share they have taken in the late insurrection, quit their secure retreats, and expose themselves to capture.  It may be a snare laid for them, but they run the risk.  Others, coming from a yet greater distance, beholding the illuminated church from afar, and catching the sound of the bell tolling at intervals, hurry on, and reach the gate breathless and wellnigh exhausted.  But no questions are asked.  All who present themselves in ecclesiastical habits are permitted to enter, and take part in the procession forming in the cloister, or proceed at once to the church, if they prefer it.

Dolefully sounds the bell.  Barefooted brethren meet together, sorrowfully salute each other, and form in a long line in the great area of the cloisters.  At their head are six monks bearing tall lighted candles.  After them come the quiristers, and then one carrying the Host, between the incense-bearers.  Next comes a youth holding the bell.  Next are placed the dignitaries of the church, the prior ranking first, and the others standing two and two according to their degrees.  Near the entrance of the refectory, which occupies the whole south side of the quadrangle, stand a band of halberdiers, whose torches cast a ruddy glare on the opposite tower and buttresses of the convent church, revealing the statues not yet plucked from their niches, the crosses on the pinnacles, and the gilt image of Saint Gregory de Northbury, still holding its place over the porch.  Another band are stationed near the mouth of the vaulted passage, under the chapter-house and vestry, whose grey, irregular walls, pierced by numberless richly ornamented windows, and surmounted by small turrets, form a beautiful boundary on the right; while a third party are planted on the left, in the open space, beneath the dormitory, the torchlight flashing ruddily upon the hoary pillars and groined arches sustaining the vast structure above them.

Dolefully sounds the bell.  And the ghostly procession thrice tracks the four ambulatories of the cloisters, solemnly chanting a requiem for the dead.

Dolefully sounds the bell.  And at its summons all the old retainers of the abbot press to the gate, and sue for admittance, but in vain.  They, therefore, mount the neighbouring hill commanding the abbey, and as the solemn sounds float faintly by, and glimpses are caught of the white-robed brethren gliding along the cloisters, and rendered phantom-like by the torchlight, the beholders half imagine it must be a company of sprites, and that the departed monks have been permitted for an hour to assume their old forms, and revisit their old haunts.

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