New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 2, May, 1915 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 322 pages of information about New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 2, May, 1915.

THE BELLS OF BERLIN

[From Punch of London.]

     (Which are said to be rung by order occasionally to announce
     some supposed German victory.)

    The Bells of Berlin, how they hearten the Hun
      (Oh, dingle dong dangle ding dongle ding dee;)
    No matter what devil’s own work has been done
    They chime a loud chant of approval, each one,
    Till the people feel sure of their place in the sun
      (Oh, dangle ding dongle dong dingle ding dee.)

    If Hindenburg hustles an enemy squad
      (Oh, dingle dong dangle ding dongle ding dee,)
    The bells all announce that the alien sod
    Is damp with the death of some thousand men odd,
    Till the populace smiles with a gratified nod
      (Oh, dangle ding dongle dong dingle ding dee.)

    If Tirpitz behaves like a brute on the brine
      (Oh, dingle dong dangle ding dongle ding dee,)
    The bells with a clash and a clamor combine
    To hint that the Hated One’s on the decline,
    And the city gulps down the good tidings like wine,
      (Oh, dangle ding dongle dong dingle ding dee.)

    The Bells of Berlin, are they cracked through and through
      (Oh, dingle dong dangle ding dongle ding dee,)
    Or deaf to the discord like Germany, too? 
    For whether their changes be many or few,
    The worst of them is that they never ring true,
      (Oh, dangle ding dongle dong dingle ding dee.)

Warfare and British Labor

By Earl Kitchener, England’s Secretary of State for War

In his speech delivered in the House of Lords on March 15, 1915, Earl Kitchener calls upon the whole nation to work, not only in supplying the manhood of the country to serve in the ranks, but in supplying the necessary arms, ammunition, and equipment for successful operations in various parts of the world.

For many weeks only trench fighting has been possible owing to the climatic conditions and waterlogged state of the ground.  During this period of apparent inaction, it must not be forgotten that our troops have had to exercise the utmost individual vigilance and resource, and, owing to the proximity of the enemy’s lines, a great strain has been imposed upon them.  Prolonged warfare of this sort might be expected to affect the morale of an army, but the traditional qualities of patience, good temper, and determination have maintained our men, though highly tried, in a condition ready to act with all the initiative and courage required when the moment for an advance arrived.  The recently published accounts of the fighting in France have enabled us to appreciate how successfully our troops have taken the offensive.  The German troops, notwithstanding their carefully prepared and strongly intrenched positions, have been driven back for a considerable distance and the villages of Neuve Chapelle and L’Epinette have been captured and held by our army, with heavy losses to the enemy.

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New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 2, May, 1915 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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