The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,319 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4.

“Alarka said, ’Seeing many colours, the eye hankers after them only.  Hence, I shall destroy the eye with sharp-pointed arrows.’

“The eye said.  ’These arrows will not, O Alarka, cross through me at all.  They will pierce thy own vital parts only, and thy vital parts being pierced, thou shalt die.  Do thou then look for other arrows with which to destroy me!’ Hearing these words and reflecting upon them, he said as follows.

“Alarka said, ’This (viz., the understanding) forms many determinations with the aid of ratiocination.  Hence, I shall shoot whetted arrows at the understanding.’

“The understanding said, ’These arrows will not, O Alarka, cross through me at all.  They will pierce thy vital parts only, and thy vital parts being pierced, thou shalt die.  Do thou then look for other arrows with which to destroy me!’

“The Brahmana continued, ’Then Alarka, employing himself, even there, on penances difficult to perform and exceedingly austere, failed to obtain, by the high power (of his penances) arrows for casting at these seven.  Endued with puissance, he then, with mind well concentrated, began to reflect.  Then O best of regenerate ones, Alarka, that foremost of intelligent men, having reflected for a long time, failed to obtain anything better than Yoga.  Setting his mind on one object, he remained perfectly still, engaged in Yoga.[83] Endued with energy, he quickly slew all the senses with one arrow, having entered by Yoga into his soul and thereby attained to the highest success.  Filled with wonder, that royal sage then sang this verse:  Alas, it is a pity that we should have accomplished all acts that are external!  Alas, that we should have, endued with the thirst for enjoyment, courted (the pleasures of) sovereignty before now!  I have learnt this afterwards.  There is no happiness that is higher than Yoga.—­Do thou know this, O Rama.  Cease to slay the Kshatriyas.  Do thou practise the austerest of penances.  Thou wilt then attain to what is good.—­Thus addressed by his grandsires, Jamadagni’s son practised the austerest penances, and having practised them, that highly blessed one attained to that success which is difficult to reach.’”

SECTION XXXI

“The Brahmana said, ’There are three foes in the world.  They are said to be ninefold, agreeably to their qualities.  Exultation, satisfaction, and joy,—­these three qualities appertain to Goodness.[84] Cupidity, wrath, and hatred, these three qualities are said to appertain to Passion.  Lassitude, procrastination, and delusion, these three qualities appertain to darkness.  Cutting these with showers of arrows, the man of intelligence, free from procrastination, possessed of a tranquil soul, and with his senses under subjection, ventures to vanquish others.[85] In this connection, persons conversant with (the occurrence of) ancient cycles recite some verses which were sung in days of old by king Amvarisha

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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