The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,319 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4.
of learning, without courage, and without much wealth, thou seekest such fame as is won by knowledge and prowess and gifts.  Verily, it is for this that thou hast been pale and lean.  Thou hast not been able to acquire something upon which thou hast set thy heart for a long time.  Or, that which thou seekest to do is sought to be undone by somebody else.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.  Verily, without being able to see any fault on thy part, thou hast been cursed by somebody.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.[538] Destitute of both wealth and accomplishments thou seekest in vain to dispel the grief of thy friends and the sorrows of sorrowing men.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.  Beholding righteous persons the domestic mode of life, unrighteous persons living according to the forest mode, and emancipated persons attached to domesticity and fixed abodes, thou hast become pale and lean.  Verily, thy acts connected with Righteousness, with Wealth, and with Pleasure, as also the well-timed words spoken by thee, do not bear fruit.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.  Though endued with wisdom, yet desirous of living, thou livest with wealth obtained by thee in gift from somebody of evil conduct.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.  Beholding unrighteousness increasing on every side and righteousness languishing, thou art filled with grief.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.  Urged by time thou seekest to please all thy friends even when they are disputing and ranged on sides opposite to one another.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.  Beholding persons possessed of Vedic lore engaged in improper acts, and persons of learning unable to keep their senses under control, thou art filled with grief.  It is for this that thou art pale and lean.’  Thus praised, the Rakshasa worshipped that learned Brahmana in return, and making him his friend and bestowing sufficient wealth upon him in gift, let him off (without devouring him).’”

SECTION CXXV

“Yudhishthira said, ’Tell me, O grandsire, how a poor man, desirous of achieving his own good, should bear himself after having acquired the status of humanity and come into this region of acts that is so difficult to attain.  Tell me also what is the best of all gifts, and what should be given under what circumstances.  Tell me, O son of Ganga, who art truly deserving of honour and worship.  It behoveth thee to discourse to us on these mysteries.’

“Vaisampayana continued, ’Thus questioned by that famous monarch, viz., the son of Pandu, Bhishma explained (in these words) unto that king these high mysteries appertaining to duty.’

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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