The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,319 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4.

“Bhishma replied, ’Why, O fortunate one, dost thou consider thy soul, which is dependent (on God and Destiny and Time) to be the cause of thy actions?  The manifestation of its inaction is subtle and imperceptible to the senses.  In this connection is cited the ancient story of the conversation between Mrityu and Gautami with Kala and the Fowler and the serpent.  There was, O son of Kunti, an old lady of the name of Gautami, who was possessed of great patience and tranquillity of mind.  One day she found her son dead in consequence of having been bitten by a serpent.  An angry fowler, by name Arjunaka, bound the serpent with a string and brought it before Gautami.  He then said to her,—­This wretched serpent has been the cause of thy son’s death, O blessed lady.  Tell me quickly how this wretch is to be destroyed.  Shall I throw it into the fire or shall I hack it into pieces?  This infamous destroyer of a child does not deserve to live longer.’

“Gautami replied, ’Do thou, O Arjunaka of little understanding, release this serpent.  It doth not deserve death at thy hands.  Who is so foolish as to disregard the inevitable lot that awaits him and burdening himself with such folly sink into sin?  Those that have made themselves light by the practice of virtuous deeds, manage to cross the sea of the world even as a ship crosses the ocean.  But those that have made themselves heavy with sin sink into the bottom, even as an arrow thrown into the water.  By killing the serpent, this my boy will not be restored to life, and by letting it live, no harm will be caused to thee.  Who would go to the interminable regions of Death by slaying this living creature?’

“The fowler said, ’I know, O lady that knowest the difference between right and wrong, that the great are afflicted at the afflictions of all creatures.  But these words which thou hast spoken are fraught with instruction for only a self-contained person (and not for one plunged in sorrow).  Therefore, I must kill this serpent.  Those who value peace of mind, assign everything to the course of Time as the cause, but practical men soon assuage their grief (by revenge).  People through constant delusion, fear loss of beatitude (in the next world for acts like these). therefore, O lady, assuage thy grief by having this serpent destroyed (by me).

“Gautami replied, ’People like us are never afflicted by (such misfortune).  Good men have their souls always intent on virtue.  The death of the boy was predestined:  therefore, I am unable to approve of the destruction of this serpent.  Brahmanas do not harbour resentment, because resentment leads to pain.  Do thou, O good man, forgive and release this serpent out of compassion.’

“The fowler replied, ’Let us earn great and inexhaustible merit hereafter by killing (this creature), even as a man acquires great merit, and confers it on his victim sacrificed as well, by sacrifice upon the altar.  Merit is acquired by killing an enemy:  by killing this despicable creature, thou shalt acquire great and true merit hereafter.’

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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