The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,319 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4.
and when he was seated with his wife on the same seat, Vipula represented unto him everything that Sakra had done.  Hearing these words of Vipula, that foremost of Munis, endued with great prowess, became highly gratified with him for his conduct and disposition, his penances, and his observances.  Observing Vipula’s conduct towards himself—­his preceptor—­and his devotion also, and noting his steadiness in virtue, the puissant Devasarman exclaimed, “Excellent, excellent!’ The righteous-souled Devasarman, receiving his virtuous disciple with a sincere welcome, honoured him with a boon.  Indeed, Vipula, steady in virtue obtained from his preceptor the boon that he would never swerve or fall away from righteousness.  Dismissed by his preceptor he left his abode and practised the most severe austerities.  Devasarman also, of severe penances, with his spouse, began from that day to live in those solitary woods, perfectly fearless of him who had slain Vala and Vritra.’”

SECTION XLII

“Bhishma said, ’Having accomplished his preceptor’s behest, Vipula practised the most severe penances.  Possessed of great energy, he at last regarded himself as endued with sufficient ascetic merit, Priding himself upon the feat he had achieved, he wandered fearlessly and contentedly over the earth, O monarch, regarded by all as one possessed of great fame for what he had done.  The puissant Bhargava regarded that he had conquered both the worlds by that feat of his as also by his severe penances.  After some time had passed away, O delighter of the Kurus, the occasion came for a ceremony of gifts to take place with respect to the sister of Ruchi.  Abundant wealth and corn were to be given away in it.[276] Meanwhile, a certain celestial damsel endued with great beauty, was journeying through the skies.  From her body as she coursed through the welkin, some flowers dropped down on the earth.  Those flowers possessed of celestial fragrance fell on a spot not far from the retreat of Ruchi’s husband.  As the flowers lay scattered on the ground, they were picked up by Ruchi of beautiful eyes.  Soon after an invitation came to Ruchi from the country of the Angas.  The sister, referred to above, of Ruchi, named Prabhavati, was the spouse of Chitraratha, the ruler of the Angas.  Ruchi, of very superior complexion, having attached those flowers to her hair, went to the palace of the king of the Angas in answer to the invitation she had received.  Beholding those flowers on her hair the queen of the Angas, possessed of beautiful eyes, urged her sister to obtain some for her.  Ruchi, of beautiful face, speedily informed her husband of that request of her sister.  The Rishi accepted the prayer of his sister-in-law.  Summoning Vipula into his presence Devasarman of severe penances commanded his disciple to bring him some flowers of the same kind, saying, ‘Go, go!’ Accepting without hesitation the behest of his preceptor, the great

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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