The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 2,413 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3.
the ocean has come to be called Sagara after his name.  When he, O Srinjaya, who far surpassed thee in the four principal attributes and who was purer than thy son, fell a prey to death, do not grieve for thy son that is dead.  We hear, O Srinjaya, that king Prithu also, the son of Vena, fell a prey to death.  The great Rishis, assembling together in the great forest, installed him in the sovereignty of the earth.  And because it was thought that he would advance all mankind, he was, for that reason, called Prithu (the advancer).  And because also he protected people from injuries (Kshata), he was, for that reason, called a Kshatriya (protector from injuries).  Beholding Prithu the son of Vena, all the creatures of the earth exclaimed, ‘We have been lovingly attached to him.’  From this circumstance of the loving attachment (to him of all creatures), he came to be called a Raja (one that can inspire attachment).  The earth, during his sway, yielded crops without being tilled, every leaf that the trees had bore honey; and every cow yielded a jugful of milk.  All men were hale and all their wishes used to be crowned with fruition.  They had no fear of any kind.  They used to live, as they pleased, in fields or in (sheltered) houses.  When Prithu desired to go over the sea, the waters became solidified.  The rivers also never swelled up when he had to cross them but remained perfectly calm.  The standard on his car moved freely everywhere (without being obstructed by any impediment).  King Prithu, in one of his grand Horse-sacrifices, gave away unto the Brahman as one and twenty mountains of gold, each measuring three nalwas.[102] When he, O Srinjaya, who far surpassed thee in the four principal attributes and who was purer than thy son, fell a prey to death, do not grieve for thy son that is dead.  Upon what, O Srinjaya, dost thou reflect in silence?  It seems, O king, that thou hearest not these words of mine.  If thou hast not heard them, then this discourse of mine has been a fruitless rhapsody, like medicine or diet, to a person on the point of death.’

“Srinjaya said, ’I am attending, O Narada, to this discourse of thine, of excellent import and perfumed like a garland of flowers,—­this discourse upon the conduct of high-souled royal sages of meritorious deeds and great fame, that can certainly dispel grief.  Thy discourse, O great sage, has not been a fruitless rhapsody.  I have been freed from grief at thy very sight.  Like one never satiated with drinking nectar, I am not satiated with thy words.  O thou of true sight, if thou, O lord, be inclined to show thy grace towards this person burning on account of the death of his son, then that son, through that grace of thine, is sure to be revived and to mingle once more with me (in this life).

“Narada said, ’I will give back to thee that son of thine, named Suvarnashthivin, whom Parvata gave thee and who has been bereft of life.  Of the splendour of gold, that child shall have a thousand years.’”

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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